heros without faces Essay

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FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS

Throughout school, many students come in contact with the picture of the six marines raising the American flag in the battle of Iwo Jima. The students also know this picture as a statue that was made to honor all of those that were lost in this tragic battle. James Bradley wanted to change how people looked at this picture or statue. He wanted to give each marine a name to go along with the hand or face that is seen in the picture. James, when writing the book, makes each chapter the next stage in each of the six men lives.
James Bradley begins the book by giving the reader the background of each of men. The men, oddly enough, represent how America was before World War II started. There is the farmer, Franklin
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By the end of the chapter, all six men are transferred to a special unit of the Marines to begin a year of hard training. This is where they found out that they were going on a special mission to “Island X”, later revealed as Iwo Jima. This training camp was also where they all met because they were in the same company, Easy Company. The men tried to stay up-beat, but most of them knew that the battle of Iwo Jima was going to be there last.
After training the six men were then placed in a group, called Spearhead, which left Pearl Harbor and sailed toward Iwo Jima hoping to make land fall on February 19, 1945, also known as D-day. The defenses the Japanese built on Iwo Jima was like none ever expected. They made what looked like an underground city with an extensive series of underground tunnels, James Bradley explains. This defense is what made Iwo Jima the bloodiest and most costly battle of the war in terms of lives lost and injuries.
James Bradley describes how he found people to give interviews to describe the events of the first awful days of battle for the Marines at Iwo Jima. To let the reader know just how bad D-day was, James puts in these statistics: 566 men were killed, 1,755 wounded, and 99 suffered combat fatigue, which allowed the story to come alive.
To allow his men to have an advantage over the other companies, Mike Strank told
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