summary Entrepreneuring as Emancipation

2020 Words Mar 17th, 2015 9 Pages
Entrepreneuring as Emancipation Rindova, Barry, and Ketchen 2009

Entrepreneuring: efforts to bring about new economic, social, institutional, and cultural environments through the actions of an individual or group of individuals → emancipatory process with broad change potential. This view foregrounds three aspects: (1) seeking autonomy, (2) authoring, and (3) making declarations.

There exist four main approaches about what entrepreneurs distinguishes from managers: (1) creation of new organizations, (2) high-growth, high-wealth-creating businesses, (3) innovations and creation of new products and markets, and (4) recognition and pursuit of profitable opportunities. The underlying assumption is that wealth creation is a
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Seeking autonomy
Autonomy is a goal of emancipation which is defined as breaking free from the authority of another. The hope for autonomy is one of the main drivers of efforts to become self-employed. Breaking free suggests the desire to make one’s own way in the world, breaking up draws attention to the striving to imagine and create a better world. Analyzing the seeking autonomy aspects of entrepreneuring opens up the following directions in entrepreneurship research:
The breaking up aspect of emancipation resonates with the Schumpeterian view of entrepreneurship as “creative destruction”. However, the emancipatory view goes beyond the Schumpeterian view by attending to both the breaking free and the breaking up. Example: how do entrepreneurial efforts may be affected by different conceptualizations of autonomy? Escaping the default individualist assumptions derived from the disciplines of psychology and economics that have informed it, and theorizing and researching both deeply individualist and social aspects.
It involves the breaking up of constraints. The emancipatory perspective sees creative destruction as one of its goals (instead of the mean).
Entrepreneuring individuals and groups often solve technological and other problems because they are internally motivated to change their worlds. The emancipatory perspective suggests that understanding the
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