the partition of 1947 was inevitable Essay example

1540 Words Dec 22nd, 2013 7 Pages
Was the 1947 Partition of India inevitable?

In August of 2012, the nations of India and Pakistan celebrated their 65th year of independence from the British Raj. Although its significance was overshadowed by the Independence Day celebrations, August 2012 also marked 65 years since the tragic and violent partition of India and Pakistan. The newfound independence in 1947 was met with mixed feelings. Although the people of India, through nationalism and self-determination, had finally rid themselves from British Imperialism, they now found themselves divided into two nations. While the predominantly Hindu area remained as India, the Northwestern and Eastern, predominantly Muslim area was separated and turned into an independent
…show more content…
Viceroy Mountbatten and Britain had to oblige to the League’s request and go forth with the partition. Often, the main factor and one root cause cited for the partition of India is religion, however, looking back at the timing and situation historically, religion might’ve been a reason, but perhaps one that was intentionally stressed so that nation could be separated more easily. It can be considered that Jinnah, who initially supported Hindu and Muslim unity, eventually realized the extent of power he could gain with a separate Pakistan5. This drove him to support the idea of a separate nation to succeed in his personal ambition. Furthermore, in 1947, the Cold War had also just started between the Western powers against the Soviets. It is possible that the British intentionally separated the nation, realizing that a separate Pakistan would be beneficial in fighting the Soviets6. However, without those initial differences and conflicts between the religious groups, there would be no way to push forth and execute the partition afterwards, so there were plenty of reasons why it was inevitable.

When Jinnah’s early beliefs are contrasted with his later beliefs, many contradictions are found. It is likely that Jinnah’s beliefs changed to adapt to his idea of gaining power7. Like other early members of the Congress, Muhammad Ali Jinnah was also a well to do lawyer,