why to be a chemical engineer

2047 WordsDec 5, 20149 Pages
Christian Gonzales Mrs. Krametbauer English III 10 November 2014 Why Chemical Engineering? Individuals take engineering as something distance to their lives due to rigorous courses to get through. As some would say that it is not worth it, other clever individuals have figured this out. To be a chemical engineer, an individual explores and takes on other sciences to create important products to better peoples lives. As Mark and Sherri Devaney stated, “…Chemical Engineers are charged primarily with finding ways to put science and engineering principles to work…” with their purpose being, “…to help corporations and organizations create useful, cost effective products that will benefit consumers…”.(pg. 43) As it was brought up earlier, to…show more content…
But this is a life issue, not an engineering issue.”(n.pag) With actual experience and not statistics with studies, this valuable advice could prepare an applicant to be disciplined in a different category than engineering itself, therefore, expanding their diversity of knowledge and interaction. These could truly be attributes an applicant would want to desire even if they didn’t decide to pursue chemical engineering. In chemical engineering, an applicant would not only want to submerse themselves in complete knowledge of chemical engineering, but also in learning qualifications that could get them noticed and hired. To be a chemical engineer, an applicant should not be only strong in the occupation itself, but also in their interaction and sociability. A chemical engineer informs a group of applicants by stating, “A lot of my work is team-oriented. I work with a few other people and we all depend on each other to bring certain results or knowledge to the group as a whole so that we can accomplish our overall goal.” (n.pag) By having interactive qualities, it is clear and also postulated that one cannot be an introverted person when looking to get hired. By actual accounts of a chemical engineer, he postulates and informs applicants that, “All engineers must at some point (if not nearly always) work as part of a group or team, and all engineers must be able to communicate the results of their work - to their peers, supervisors, upper management, subordinates, and
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