8. As explained in the text, the cause of many geneticdiseases cannot yet be discerned by analyzing wholeexome/genome sequences. But in some of theseseemingly intractable cases, important clues can beobtained by looking at mRNAs or proteins, ratherthan at the DNA.a. As you will see in more detail in later chapters, it ispossible to use single-molecule methods to sequence cDNA copies of millions of mRNA molecules from any particular tissue cheaply. Howcould you sometimes use such information to finda disease gene? When would this information benoninformative?b. A technique called Western blotting allows you toexamine any protein for which you have an antibody; it is possible to see differences in size oramount of that protein. How could you sometimesuse such information to find a disease gene? Whenwould this information be noninformative?

Question

8. As explained in the text, the cause of many genetic
diseases cannot yet be discerned by analyzing wholeexome/genome sequences. But in some of these
seemingly intractable cases, important clues can be
obtained by looking at mRNAs or proteins, rather
than at the DNA.
a. As you will see in more detail in later chapters, it is
possible to use single-molecule methods to sequence cDNA copies of millions of mRNA molecules from any particular tissue cheaply. How
could you sometimes use such information to find
a disease gene? When would this information be
noninformative?
b. A technique called Western blotting allows you to
examine any protein for which you have an antibody; it is possible to see differences in size or
amount of that protein. How could you sometimes
use such information to find a disease gene? When
would this information be noninformative?

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