Origin of new genevia gene duplicationFunction AGene ZabGene ZFunction BGene duplicationFunction AGenes Z, and Z, areinitially identical togene Z.Gene Z,Z,abFunction BZ,Function AabGene Z,Function B2 Subfunctionalization3 NeofunctionalizationPseudogeneFunctionab z,z, Xz,Gene Z,Gene Z, → Function AakZ,abFunction AZ,Z,Gene Z, → Function cabGene Z, → Function BInactivatingGene Z, retains theoriginal function ofgene Z, while gene Z,acquires a new function.The compositefunctions of genes Z,and Z, are equivalentto those of gene z.mutationsab z,z, XabFunction AGene Z,Function B2015 Pearson Eduoalion, Ino. Majority of new genesGene duplicationDerivation ofexons fromtransposableelements (TE)TEDuplicationI DivergenceNew splice sitesevolve within TEGene duplication byunequal crossoverOther TE sequencesdegenerateLateral genetransferOrganism A| TransferExon shufflingOrganism B| DivergeOrganism BGene fission/fusionFusion t FissionReversetranscription| TranscriptionDe novo derivationfrom noncodingsequenceReverse transcriptionand insertion© 2019 Pearson Education, Inc.2019 Pearson Education, Inc.

Question
Asked Dec 9, 2019
66 views

How do these 2 diagrams fit within the scope of evolutionary genomics?

Origin of new gene
via gene duplication
Function A
Gene Z
ab
Gene Z
Function B
Gene duplication
Function A
Genes Z, and Z, are
initially identical to
gene Z.
Gene Z,
Z,
ab
Function B
Z,
Function A
ab
Gene Z,
Function B
2 Subfunctionalization
3 Neofunctionalization
Pseudogene
Function
ab z,
z, X
z,
Gene Z,
Gene Z, → Function A
ak
Z,
ab
Function A
Z,
Z,
Gene Z, → Function c
ab
Gene Z, → Function B
Inactivating
Gene Z, retains the
original function of
gene Z, while gene Z,
acquires a new function.
The composite
functions of genes Z,
and Z, are equivalent
to those of gene z.
mutations
ab z,
z, X
ab
Function A
Gene Z,
Function B
2015 Pearson Eduoalion, Ino.
help_outline

Image Transcriptionclose

Origin of new gene via gene duplication Function A Gene Z ab Gene Z Function B Gene duplication Function A Genes Z, and Z, are initially identical to gene Z. Gene Z, Z, ab Function B Z, Function A ab Gene Z, Function B 2 Subfunctionalization 3 Neofunctionalization Pseudogene Function ab z, z, X z, Gene Z, Gene Z, → Function A ak Z, ab Function A Z, Z, Gene Z, → Function c ab Gene Z, → Function B Inactivating Gene Z, retains the original function of gene Z, while gene Z, acquires a new function. The composite functions of genes Z, and Z, are equivalent to those of gene z. mutations ab z, z, X ab Function A Gene Z, Function B 2015 Pearson Eduoalion, Ino.

fullscreen
Majority of new genes
Gene duplication
Derivation of
exons from
transposable
elements (TE)
TE
Duplication
I Divergence
New splice sites
evolve within TE
Gene duplication by
unequal crossover
Other TE sequences
degenerate
Lateral gene
transfer
Organism A
| Transfer
Exon shuffling
Organism B
| Diverge
Organism B
Gene fission/
fusion
Fusion t Fission
Reverse
transcription
| Transcription
De novo derivation
from noncoding
sequence
Reverse transcription
and insertion
© 2019 Pearson Education, Inc.
2019 Pearson Education, Inc.
help_outline

Image Transcriptionclose

Majority of new genes Gene duplication Derivation of exons from transposable elements (TE) TE Duplication I Divergence New splice sites evolve within TE Gene duplication by unequal crossover Other TE sequences degenerate Lateral gene transfer Organism A | Transfer Exon shuffling Organism B | Diverge Organism B Gene fission/ fusion Fusion t Fission Reverse transcription | Transcription De novo derivation from noncoding sequence Reverse transcription and insertion © 2019 Pearson Education, Inc. 2019 Pearson Education, Inc.

fullscreen
check_circle

Expert Answer

Step 1
  • Evolutionary genomics deals with the evolution of genomes of different species. It involves the study of change in characteristics of the genome between species and within the species on an evolution-based time scale.
  • These diagrams indicate the evolution of genes by different processes. The first diagram elaborates on the main mechanism of genome evolution that is gene duplication.
  • The evolution of genes can occur through the following processes:

1) Gene duplication: Two copies of a gene are created in the genome. The newly duplicated copy can acquire a new function or it can acquire an inactivating mutation leading to disruption of its function.

2) Exon shuffling: It is the coming together of exons from different regions of the genome or duplication of a single exon to create a new intron-exon junction. It leads to the creation of new genes.

3) Reverse transcription: The reverse transcription of an mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid) produces complementary DNA ( deoxyribonucleic acid) that can insert in...

Want to see the full answer?

See Solution

Check out a sample Q&A here.

Want to see this answer and more?

Solutions are written by subject experts who are available 24/7. Questions are typically answered within 1 hour.*

See Solution
*Response times may vary by subject and question.
Tagged in

Science

Biology

Evolution and Adaptation

Related Biology Q&A

Find answers to questions asked by student like you
Show more Q&A
add
question_answer

Q: Describe the use of DNA probe and PCR for: a. Rapid identification of an unknown bacterium b. Determ...

A: DNA probes:These are stretches of single-stranded DNA used to detect the presence of complementary n...

question_answer

Q: #16) The restriction enzymes Xhol and SalI cut their specific sequences as shown below:  XhoI 5' C |...

A: The sticky ends generated after cleavage by the Xho1 and Sal1 are shown on the white board.

question_answer

Q: The following shows the results of DNA profiling from a rape case. The evidence sample (S) consists ...

A: DNA profiling is the process in which a DNA pattern obtained from a person or sample, and this DNA p...

question_answer

Q: What is soil pollution?Suggest various ways to prevent soil pollution?

A: Pollution is the unwanted introduction of contaminants into the natural environment that cause adver...

question_answer

Q: here is a second, delayed spike of IgM in the secondary response. Why might this be occurring?

A: when a foreign substance enters into the body immune system response and fights against invaders whi...

question_answer

Q: Nerodia sipedon insularum is a species of the Northern Water Snake that lives on islands in the west...

A: According to Hardy-Weinberg Principle: The Hardy–Weinberg principle, states that allele and genotype...

question_answer

Q: A very large population of randomly-mating laboratory mice contains 35% white mice. White coloring i...

A: The Hardy-Weinberg equation represents frequencies of alleles and genotypes in a population. This eq...

question_answer

Q: What group is first removed from amino acids and what happens to that group and the carbon backbone?

A: Transamination:It is defined as an exchange of the functional groups present between any amino acid ...

question_answer

Q: A deamination occurs on the cytosine residue in the following DNA sequence. This cytosine residue ha...

A: Deamination is one of the common forms of "hydrolytic DNA damage" in living organisms. Deamination i...