RNA polymerases generally require a primer to begin transcription. (T) (F)   The Death Cap Mushroom Amanita phalloides is toxic because of its ability to produce alpha-amanitin, which is an inhibitor of RNA Polymerases I and III. (T) (F)   In bacteria, transcription and translation can occur simultaneously. (T) (F)   In eukaryotes, transcription and translation can occur simultaneously (T) (F)   RNA polymerase II has no form of proofreading activity. (T) (F)   Sigma factors specify binding of bacterial RNA Polymerases to specific promoters (T) (F)   An E. coli strain with mutations in genes encoding both the dam methylase and the RecA protein would likely be inviable (dead) (T) (F)   An E. coli culture grown in a pure (100%) N2 atmosphere would likely have a lower rate of mutations than a culture grown under normal conditions (~30% O2 and 70% N2) (T) (F)   Non-homologous end joining repairs double strand DNA breaks with no loss of information, restoring the original sequence. (T) (F)   A culture of yeast runs out of Nitrogen and stops growing. Under these conditions, you would expect RNA Pol I to be highly active. (T) (F)   Unlike DNA, RNA is synthesized in the 3’ → 5’ (T) (F)   An E. coli strain deficient in the dam methylase would probably not be able to properly regulate the initiation of DNA replication. (T) (F)   Adding a chemical inhibitor of DNA topoisomerases to an E. coli culture would likely have an effect on the rate of DNA synthesis, but not on the rate of RNA synthesis (T) (F)   The DNA sequence upstream of a transcriptional start site (promoter) usually has consensus sequences centered at the -10 and -35 positions, but it turns out that altering this spacing has little effect on sigma factor binding. (T) (F)   The C-terminal domain of eukaryotic RNA Pol II is phosphorylated when the polymerase is actively transcribing a gene (T) (F)

Question
  1. RNA polymerases generally require a primer to begin transcription. (T) (F)

 

  1. The Death Cap Mushroom Amanita phalloides is toxic because of its ability to produce alpha-amanitin, which is an inhibitor of RNA Polymerases I and III. (T) (F)

 

  1. In bacteria, transcription and translation can occur simultaneously. (T) (F)

 

  1. In eukaryotes, transcription and translation can occur simultaneously (T) (F)

 

  1. RNA polymerase II has no form of proofreading activity. (T) (F)

 

  1. Sigma factors specify binding of bacterial RNA Polymerases to specific promoters (T) (F)

 

  1. An E. coli strain with mutations in genes encoding both the dam methylase and the RecA protein would likely be inviable (dead) (T) (F)

 

  1. An E. coli culture grown in a pure (100%) N2 atmosphere would likely have a lower rate of mutations than a culture grown under normal conditions (~30% O2 and 70% N2) (T) (F)

 

  1. Non-homologous end joining repairs double strand DNA breaks with no loss of information, restoring the original sequence. (T) (F)

 

  1. A culture of yeast runs out of Nitrogen and stops growing. Under these conditions, you would expect RNA Pol I to be highly active. (T) (F)

 

  1. Unlike DNA, RNA is synthesized in the 3’ → 5’ (T) (F)

 

  1. An E. coli strain deficient in the dam methylase would probably not be able to properly regulate the initiation of DNA replication. (T) (F)

 

  1. Adding a chemical inhibitor of DNA topoisomerases to an E. coli culture would likely have an effect on the rate of DNA synthesis, but not on the rate of RNA synthesis (T) (F)

 

  1. The DNA sequence upstream of a transcriptional start site (promoter) usually has consensus sequences centered at the -10 and -35 positions, but it turns out that altering this spacing has little effect on sigma factor binding. (T) (F)

 

  1. The C-terminal domain of eukaryotic RNA Pol II is phosphorylated when the polymerase is actively transcribing a gene (T) (F)

 

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