usiness and Bachelor of Management COURSE OUTLINE YEAR 1/MGT 101- SUBANG 2 CAMI6/30Management ThinkingWhen Andy Pforzheimer was in college, he took a road trip to New Orleans that would change his life.The sights and sounds of the Big Easy were thrilling to the nineteen-year-old student, but it was thesmells and tastes of the city restaurants that captured his imagination. While discussing the city's eclecticdining with locals, a chef challenged Pforzheimer to go to France to discover what cooking is all about.Decades after heeding the chef 's words, Pforzheimer is himself a renowned chef and the co-owner ofBarcelona Restaurant Group, a collection of seven wine and tapas bars in Connecticut and Atlanta,Georgia.Barcelona Restaurant Group prides itself on being "antichain." When customers dine at any ofPforzheimer's Spanish cuisine restaurants, they experience the local colour and personal touch of aneighborhood eatery in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, or SoHo. The wait staff is personable, and the head chef isknown for cooking up flavourful custom dishes to please regulars. Managers get to know customers' tastes,and they often descend upon tables, bringing flavourful specialties accompanied by wines from Spain,Portugal, and vineyards around the world.At Barcelona, life is all about authentic cuisine, exceptional service, and a good time. But delivering thisunique dining experience requires a unique approach to restaurant management. Barcelona RestaurantGroup gives employees the freedom and control they need to impress customers.The company begins by recruiting self-confident individuals who can take complete ownership over theestablishment and its success. When Andy Pforzheimer coaches new recruits, he instructs, "This is yourrestaurant-when customers walk in the door, I don't want them looking for me, I want them looking foryou." The straight-talking restaurateur is adamant that his staff be mature and willing to take responsibilityfor their work and success: "Some of our best managers come from highly regulated large restaurantcompanies where they were told how to answer a phone and how to set a table and how to greet a guest.We don't do that; we attempt to hire grownups."The enormous trust Barcelona places in workers is evident during weekly staff meetings. Pforzheimerroutinely mixes it up with employees, and the dialogue gets feisty at times. "I can be difficult to work for,"thecandidly."I'minterestedownersaysin having other people's opinions thrown at me. I like managers who talk back, and I like people who self-start."Scott Lawton, Barcelona's chief operating officer (COO), shares Pforzheimer's approach, and heunderscores that Barcelona's success depends on the mature initiative of employees: "We give some basicguidelines as to what our philosophy is and what our beliefs are, but we have to trust them to work withinthose confines and make the right choice."In refusing to micromanage employee behavior, Barcelona takes risks that other dining establishments f.Business and Bachelor of Management COURSE OUTLINE/YEAR 1/MGT 101-SUBANG 2 CAMPUS7/30would rather avoid. Lawton insists such risks are intentional and beneficial: "They might not always makethe choice that I would make, but sometimes they make a better one. To give them a correct answer toevery question is impossible, and it doesn't work. In fact, you're actually limiting your ability to get better."While Barcelona's leaders care about the wait staff, they make it clear that employees must care aboutthe clientele. "We're here for the customer experience," Pforzheimer says. "Everything else is secondaryto that."Lawton agrees, and he adds that Barcelona's insistence on service excellence leads to high satisfactionamong employees. "If we can empower them to make the guests happy," Lawton argues, "they're going tomake money, the vibe in the restaurant is going to be a ton of fun, everybody's going to enjoy the shift, andthey're going to be proud of what they've done. And they are happy, because that's a byproduct.Discussion Questions1. Would the management perspective of Barcelona Restaurant Group best be described as scientific managementor contingency management?2. In what ways is Barcelona's management approach consistent with modern developments inmanagement thinking?Assessment CriteriaGuide for StudentsSummary of the Case Study "Barcelona Restaurant Group- The Evolution ofManagement Thinking"MarksSummary/1013Question 1Management Description on focus of contingency viewPerspectiveor ThoughtDescription on focus ofscientific management/3/14Explanation on the most applicable management perspective of BarcelonaRestaurant Group (provide 2 reasons)Question 2ModernExplanation of 3 ways in which BRG is consistent with modern developments inmanagement thinking/33developmentsinManagementThoughtQuestion 3Challenges towait staffExplanation of 3 aspects of restaurant work that are especially challenging to waitstaff/24

Question
Asked Nov 7, 2019

Explanation of 3 ways in which BRG is consistent with modern developments in management thinking

usiness and Bachelor of Management COURSE OUTLINE YEAR 1/MGT 101- SUBANG 2 CAMI
6/30
Management Thinking
When Andy Pforzheimer was in college, he took a road trip to New Orleans that would change his life.
The sights and sounds of the Big Easy were thrilling to the nineteen-year-old student, but it was the
smells and tastes of the city restaurants that captured his imagination. While discussing the city's eclectic
dining with locals, a chef challenged Pforzheimer to go to France to discover what cooking is all about.
Decades after heeding the chef 's words, Pforzheimer is himself a renowned chef and the co-owner of
Barcelona Restaurant Group, a collection of seven wine and tapas bars in Connecticut and Atlanta,
Georgia.
Barcelona Restaurant Group prides itself on being "antichain." When customers dine at any of
Pforzheimer's Spanish cuisine restaurants, they experience the local colour and personal touch of a
neighborhood eatery in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, or SoHo. The wait staff is personable, and the head chef is
known for cooking up flavourful custom dishes to please regulars. Managers get to know customers' tastes,
and they often descend upon tables, bringing flavourful specialties accompanied by wines from Spain,
Portugal, and vineyards around the world.
At Barcelona, life is all about authentic cuisine, exceptional service, and a good time. But delivering this
unique dining experience requires a unique approach to restaurant management. Barcelona Restaurant
Group gives employees the freedom and control they need to impress customers.
The company begins by recruiting self-confident individuals who can take complete ownership over the
establishment and its success. When Andy Pforzheimer coaches new recruits, he instructs, "This is your
restaurant-when customers walk in the door, I don't want them looking for me, I want them looking for
you." The straight-talking restaurateur is adamant that his staff be mature and willing to take responsibility
for their work and success: "Some of our best managers come from highly regulated large restaurant
companies where they were told how to answer a phone and how to set a table and how to greet a guest.
We don't do that; we attempt to hire grownups."
The enormous trust Barcelona places in workers is evident during weekly staff meetings. Pforzheimer
routinely mixes it up with employees, and the dialogue gets feisty at times. "I can be difficult to work for,"
the
candidly.
"I'm
interested
owner
says
in having other people's opinions thrown at me. I like managers who talk back, and I like people who self-
start."
Scott Lawton, Barcelona's chief operating officer (COO), shares Pforzheimer's approach, and he
underscores that Barcelona's success depends on the mature initiative of employees: "We give some basic
guidelines as to what our philosophy is and what our beliefs are, but we have to trust them to work within
those confines and make the right choice."
In refusing to micromanage employee behavior, Barcelona takes risks that other dining establishments
help_outline

Image Transcriptionclose

usiness and Bachelor of Management COURSE OUTLINE YEAR 1/MGT 101- SUBANG 2 CAMI 6/30 Management Thinking When Andy Pforzheimer was in college, he took a road trip to New Orleans that would change his life. The sights and sounds of the Big Easy were thrilling to the nineteen-year-old student, but it was the smells and tastes of the city restaurants that captured his imagination. While discussing the city's eclectic dining with locals, a chef challenged Pforzheimer to go to France to discover what cooking is all about. Decades after heeding the chef 's words, Pforzheimer is himself a renowned chef and the co-owner of Barcelona Restaurant Group, a collection of seven wine and tapas bars in Connecticut and Atlanta, Georgia. Barcelona Restaurant Group prides itself on being "antichain." When customers dine at any of Pforzheimer's Spanish cuisine restaurants, they experience the local colour and personal touch of a neighborhood eatery in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, or SoHo. The wait staff is personable, and the head chef is known for cooking up flavourful custom dishes to please regulars. Managers get to know customers' tastes, and they often descend upon tables, bringing flavourful specialties accompanied by wines from Spain, Portugal, and vineyards around the world. At Barcelona, life is all about authentic cuisine, exceptional service, and a good time. But delivering this unique dining experience requires a unique approach to restaurant management. Barcelona Restaurant Group gives employees the freedom and control they need to impress customers. The company begins by recruiting self-confident individuals who can take complete ownership over the establishment and its success. When Andy Pforzheimer coaches new recruits, he instructs, "This is your restaurant-when customers walk in the door, I don't want them looking for me, I want them looking for you." The straight-talking restaurateur is adamant that his staff be mature and willing to take responsibility for their work and success: "Some of our best managers come from highly regulated large restaurant companies where they were told how to answer a phone and how to set a table and how to greet a guest. We don't do that; we attempt to hire grownups." The enormous trust Barcelona places in workers is evident during weekly staff meetings. Pforzheimer routinely mixes it up with employees, and the dialogue gets feisty at times. "I can be difficult to work for," the candidly. "I'm interested owner says in having other people's opinions thrown at me. I like managers who talk back, and I like people who self- start." Scott Lawton, Barcelona's chief operating officer (COO), shares Pforzheimer's approach, and he underscores that Barcelona's success depends on the mature initiative of employees: "We give some basic guidelines as to what our philosophy is and what our beliefs are, but we have to trust them to work within those confines and make the right choice." In refusing to micromanage employee behavior, Barcelona takes risks that other dining establishments

fullscreen
f.Business and Bachelor of Management COURSE OUTLINE/YEAR 1/MGT 101-SUBANG 2 CAMPUS
7/30
would rather avoid. Lawton insists such risks are intentional and beneficial: "They might not always make
the choice that I would make, but sometimes they make a better one. To give them a correct answer to
every question is impossible, and it doesn't work. In fact, you're actually limiting your ability to get better."
While Barcelona's leaders care about the wait staff, they make it clear that employees must care about
the clientele. "We're here for the customer experience," Pforzheimer says. "Everything else is secondary
to that."
Lawton agrees, and he adds that Barcelona's insistence on service excellence leads to high satisfaction
among employees. "If we can empower them to make the guests happy," Lawton argues, "they're going to
make money, the vibe in the restaurant is going to be a ton of fun, everybody's going to enjoy the shift, and
they're going to be proud of what they've done. And they are happy, because that's a byproduct.
Discussion Questions
1. Would the management perspective of Barcelona Restaurant Group best be described as scientific management
or contingency management?
2. In what ways is Barcelona's management approach consistent with modern developments in
management thinking?
Assessment Criteria
Guide for Students
Summary of the Case Study "Barcelona Restaurant Group- The Evolution of
Management Thinking"
Marks
Summary
/10
13
Question 1
Management Description on focus of contingency view
Perspective
or Thought
Description on focus of
scientific management
/3
/14
Explanation on the most applicable management perspective of Barcelona
Restaurant Group (provide 2 reasons)
Question 2
Modern
Explanation of 3 ways in which BRG is consistent with modern developments in
management thinking
/33
developments
in
Management
Thought
Question 3
Challenges to
wait staff
Explanation of 3 aspects of restaurant work that are especially challenging to wait
staff
/24
help_outline

Image Transcriptionclose

f.Business and Bachelor of Management COURSE OUTLINE/YEAR 1/MGT 101-SUBANG 2 CAMPUS 7/30 would rather avoid. Lawton insists such risks are intentional and beneficial: "They might not always make the choice that I would make, but sometimes they make a better one. To give them a correct answer to every question is impossible, and it doesn't work. In fact, you're actually limiting your ability to get better." While Barcelona's leaders care about the wait staff, they make it clear that employees must care about the clientele. "We're here for the customer experience," Pforzheimer says. "Everything else is secondary to that." Lawton agrees, and he adds that Barcelona's insistence on service excellence leads to high satisfaction among employees. "If we can empower them to make the guests happy," Lawton argues, "they're going to make money, the vibe in the restaurant is going to be a ton of fun, everybody's going to enjoy the shift, and they're going to be proud of what they've done. And they are happy, because that's a byproduct. Discussion Questions 1. Would the management perspective of Barcelona Restaurant Group best be described as scientific management or contingency management? 2. In what ways is Barcelona's management approach consistent with modern developments in management thinking? Assessment Criteria Guide for Students Summary of the Case Study "Barcelona Restaurant Group- The Evolution of Management Thinking" Marks Summary /10 13 Question 1 Management Description on focus of contingency view Perspective or Thought Description on focus of scientific management /3 /14 Explanation on the most applicable management perspective of Barcelona Restaurant Group (provide 2 reasons) Question 2 Modern Explanation of 3 ways in which BRG is consistent with modern developments in management thinking /33 developments in Management Thought Question 3 Challenges to wait staff Explanation of 3 aspects of restaurant work that are especially challenging to wait staff /24

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Ways in which BRG is consistent with modern developments in management thinking:

Customer satisfaction: The focus of the management is on customer satisfaction. The management takes care of the employees. And the employees take care of the customers. They have a personable wait staff and the head chef makes customized dishes to please the customers.

Total quality management: Barcelona\'s management approach focuses on total quality management, customer satisfactio...

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