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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

Suppose you have a cylindrical glass tube with a thin capillary opening, and you wish to determine the diameter of the opening. You can do this experimentally by weighing a piece of the tubing before and after filling a portion of the capillary with mercury. Using the following information, calculate the diameter of the opening.

Mass of tube before adding mercury = 3.263 g

Mass of tube after adding mercury — 3.416 g

Length of capillary filled with mercury = 16.75 mm

Density of mercury = 13.546 g/cm3

Volume of cylindrical capillary filled with mercury — (π) (radius)2 (length)

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation: The diameter of the opening has to be calculated.

Concept Introduction:

Density: A measurement of mass per unit volume.

  Density = Mass volume

Explanation

The diameter of the opening is calculated as,

  Density = Mass volumeGiven:Mass of the mercury =(3.416 - 3.263)g = 0.153 g ; density (mercury) = 13.546 g/cm313.546 g/cm3 = 0.153 gVV=0.153 g13.546 g/cm3=0.01129 cm3Calculate the diameter of the opening:_length = 16

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