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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

A standard U.S. postage stamp is 2.5 cm long and 2.1 cm wide. What is the area of the stamp in square centimeters? In square meters?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation: The area of the postage stamp in square centimeters and square meters has to be given.

Concept Introduction:

Area of rectangle: Area = l (length)×b (wide)

Conversion of centimeters to meters:1cm = 0.01 m 

Explanation

The area of the postage stamp in square centimeters is calculated as,

Area of the postage stamp in square centimeters:

Given:length = 2.5cm, wide = 2.1 cm.Area of rectangle (stamp) = l×w                                         = 2.5cm×2.1 cm                                         = 5.3 cm2

The obtained area of the postage stamp in square centimeters is 5

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