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Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiolo...

7th Edition
Des Jardins + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337794909

Solutions

Chapter
Section
BuyFindarrow_forward

Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiolo...

7th Edition
Des Jardins + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337794909
Textbook Problem

Shortly after birth, the ductus arteriosus constricts in response to

1. Increased P o 2

2. Decreased P co 2

3. Increased pH

4. Prostaglandins

A. 1 only

B. 2 only

C. 3 and 4 only

D. 1 and 4 only

Summary Introduction

Introduction:

At the time of birth, many changes occur in the newborn, the most important being the ability to start breathing through the lungs. Apart from that, there are changes that occur in the circulatory system.

Explanation

Explanation for the correct answer:

Option (d) is, ‘increase in PO2 and the release of prostaglandins.’ There are changes that occur in the circulatory system. A few minutes after birth, the ductus arteriosis constricts in response to the increase in oxygen pressure of the blood or PO2. Hormones and other substances, like prostaglandin and serotonoin, also help in the constriction.

Hence, option (d) is the correct answer.

Explanation for the incorrect answer:

Option (A) is, ‘1 only’...

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