BuyFind

Oceanography: An Invitation To Mar...

9th Edition
Garrison + 1 other
Publisher: Brooks Cole
ISBN: 9781305254282
BuyFind

Oceanography: An Invitation To Mar...

9th Edition
Garrison + 1 other
Publisher: Brooks Cole
ISBN: 9781305254282

Solutions

Chapter
Section
Chapter 10, Problem 1TC
Textbook Problem

Though they move across the deepest ocean basins, seiches and tsunami are referred to as “shallow-water waves.” How can this be?

Expert Solution
To determine

The reason why seiches and tsunami are referred to as “shallow-water waves” even though they move across the deepest ocean basins.

Answer to Problem 1TC

Seiches and tsunami are in shallow or intermediate depth in water since the depth of ocean is not more than 50 kilometers.

Explanation of Solution

Even though seiches and tsunamis move across the deepest ocean basin, they are referred as shallow water waves. Because most of the ocean floor has a depth more than 125 meters, and it is half the wavelength of very large wind waves. A deep water wave can be defined as a wave in water that is deeper than half of its wavelength. The wavelength of a seismic wave generally exceeds 100 kilometers. No ocean has a depth of 50 kilometers. Therefore, seiches, seismic sea waves, and tides are in a shallow or intermediate depth in water. Its huge orbit circles flattening against a distant bottom will always be less than half of its wavelength.

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Chapter 10 Solutions

Oceanography: An Invitation To Marine Science, Loose-leaf Versin
Show all chapter solutions
Ch. 10.4 - How are wind waves formed? Whats a fetch?Ch. 10.4 - How does the wavelength of a wind wave affect its...Ch. 10.4 - What is a fully developed sea?Ch. 10.4 - How is group velocity different from the velocity...Ch. 10.5 - Can constructive or destructive interference ever...Ch. 10.5 - Whats a rogue wave? Are rogue waves potentially...Ch. 10.6 - Why is the southern tip of South Africa such a...Ch. 10.6 - What technical innovation made surfing waves of...Ch. 10.6 - When does a wind wave become a shallow-water wave...Ch. 10.6 - What factors influence the breaking of a wind...Ch. 10.6 - What might cause waves approaching a shore at an...Ch. 10.7 - Are the wave speed and period of an internal wave...Ch. 10.7 - Are internal waves dangerous?Ch. 10.8 - Is there really any such thing as a true tidal...Ch. 10.9 - What causes a storm surge? Why is a storm surge so...Ch. 10.9 - Can a storm surge be predicted?Ch. 10.10 - Lake Michigan is long and narrow and trends...Ch. 10.10 - What would a standing wave look like in a...Ch. 10.10 - Is a seiche dangerous?Ch. 10.11 - How long would it take for a tsunami to travel...Ch. 10.11 - What causes tsunami? Do all geological...Ch. 10.11 - How fast does a tsunami move?Ch. 10.11 - Is a tsunami a shallow-water wave or a deep-water...Ch. 10.11 - What is the wave height of a typical tsunami away...Ch. 10.11 - Does a tsunami come ashore as a single wave? A...Ch. 10.11 - What caused the most destructive tsunami in recent...Ch. 10.11 - How might one detect and warn against tsunami?Ch. 10 - Though they move across the deepest ocean basins,...Ch. 10 - How do particles move in an ocean wave? How is...Ch. 10 - What is the general relationship between...Ch. 10 - How can a rogue wave be larger than the...Ch. 10 - How is a progressive wave different from a...Ch. 10 - How can large waves generated by a distant storm...

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