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Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425
Textbook Problem
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A chunk of ice at room temperature melts, even (bough the process is endothermic. Why?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

The reason for spontaneous reaction of melting of chunk of ice at room should be explained.

Concept Introduction:

The disorder is expressed by a thermodynamic quantity called entropy. Entropy of universe goes on increase for spontaneous process. Entropy depends on the degree of randomness or disorder associated with the particles that carry the energy. Liquid has the higher entropy than solid because liquids are more disordered than solids.

Explanation

When chunk of ice at room temperature melts, solid becomes liquid. So its entropy change is positive...

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