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General Chemistry - Standalone boo...

11th Edition
Steven D. Gammon + 7 others
ISBN: 9781305580343

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BuyFindarrow_forward

General Chemistry - Standalone boo...

11th Edition
Steven D. Gammon + 7 others
ISBN: 9781305580343
Textbook Problem

Aqueous solutions of ammonia, NH3, were once thought to be solutions of an ionic compound (ammonium hydroxide. NH4OH) in order to explain how the solutions could contain hydroxide ion. Using the Brønsted–Lowry concept, show how NH3 yields hydroxide ion in aqueous solution without involving the species NH4OH.

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

How ammonia yield hydroxide ion in aqueous solution without involving the species NH4OH has to be shown.

Concept Introduction:

Bronsted-Lowry theory:

Acid: According to Bronsted-Lowry theory, a species which donates a proton in a proton transfer-reaction is said to be an acid.

Base: According to Bronsted-Lowry theory, a species which accepts a proton in a proton transfer-reaction is said to be base.

Explanation
  • For NH4OH to have hydroxide ion in the solution there is no other species required.
  • mole of ammonia reacts with 1 mole of water to produce 1 mole of hydroxide ion and the reaction can be represented as follows.

  NH3(aq) + H2

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Chapter 15 Solutions

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Sect-15.8 P-15.8ESect-15.8 P-15.9ESect-15.8 P-15.10ESect-15.8 P-15.4CCCh-15 P-15.1QPCh-15 P-15.2QPCh-15 P-15.3QPCh-15 P-15.4QPCh-15 P-15.5QPCh-15 P-15.6QPCh-15 P-15.7QPCh-15 P-15.8QPCh-15 P-15.9QPCh-15 P-15.10QPCh-15 P-15.11QPCh-15 P-15.12QPCh-15 P-15.13QPCh-15 P-15.14QPCh-15 P-15.15QPCh-15 P-15.16QPCh-15 P-15.17QPCh-15 P-15.18QPCh-15 P-15.19QPCh-15 P-15.20QPCh-15 P-15.21QPCh-15 P-15.22QPCh-15 P-15.23QPCh-15 P-15.24QPCh-15 P-15.25QPCh-15 P-15.26QPCh-15 P-15.27QPCh-15 P-15.28QPCh-15 P-15.29QPCh-15 P-15.30QPCh-15 P-15.31QPCh-15 P-15.32QPCh-15 P-15.33QPCh-15 P-15.34QPCh-15 P-15.35QPCh-15 P-15.36QPCh-15 P-15.37QPCh-15 P-15.38QPCh-15 P-15.39QPCh-15 P-15.40QPCh-15 P-15.41QPCh-15 P-15.42QPCh-15 P-15.43QPCh-15 P-15.44QPCh-15 P-15.45QPCh-15 P-15.46QPCh-15 P-15.47QPCh-15 P-15.48QPCh-15 P-15.49QPCh-15 P-15.50QPCh-15 P-15.51QPCh-15 P-15.52QPCh-15 P-15.53QPCh-15 P-15.54QPCh-15 P-15.55QPCh-15 P-15.56QPCh-15 P-15.57QPCh-15 P-15.58QPCh-15 P-15.59QPCh-15 P-15.60QPCh-15 P-15.61QPCh-15 P-15.62QPCh-15 P-15.63QPCh-15 P-15.64QPCh-15 P-15.65QPCh-15 P-15.66QPCh-15 P-15.67QPCh-15 P-15.68QPCh-15 P-15.69QPCh-15 P-15.70QPCh-15 P-15.71QPCh-15 P-15.72QPCh-15 P-15.73QPCh-15 P-15.74QPCh-15 P-15.75QPCh-15 P-15.76QPCh-15 P-15.77QPCh-15 P-15.78QPCh-15 P-15.79QPCh-15 P-15.80QPCh-15 P-15.81QPCh-15 P-15.82QPCh-15 P-15.83QPCh-15 P-15.84QPCh-15 P-15.85QPCh-15 P-15.86QPCh-15 P-15.87QPCh-15 P-15.88QPCh-15 P-15.89QPCh-15 P-15.90QPCh-15 P-15.91QPCh-15 P-15.92QPCh-15 P-15.93QPCh-15 P-15.94QPCh-15 P-15.95QPCh-15 P-15.96QPCh-15 P-15.97QPCh-15 P-15.98QPCh-15 P-15.99QPCh-15 P-15.100QPCh-15 P-15.101QPCh-15 P-15.102QPCh-15 P-15.103QPCh-15 P-15.104QPCh-15 P-15.105QPCh-15 P-15.106QPCh-15 P-15.107QPCh-15 P-15.108QPCh-15 P-15.109QPCh-15 P-15.110QPCh-15 P-15.111QPCh-15 P-15.112QPCh-15 P-15.113QPCh-15 P-15.114QPCh-15 P-15.115QPCh-15 P-15.116QPCh-15 P-15.117QPCh-15 P-15.118QPCh-15 P-15.119QPCh-15 P-15.120QPCh-15 P-15.121QPCh-15 P-15.122QPCh-15 P-15.123QPCh-15 P-15.124QPCh-15 P-15.125QPCh-15 P-15.126QPCh-15 P-15.127QPCh-15 P-15.128QPCh-15 P-15.129QPCh-15 P-15.130QPCh-15 P-15.131QPCh-15 P-15.132QP

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