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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

Calculate K for the reaction

Fe(s) + H2O(g) ⇄ FeO(s) + H2(g)

given the following information:

H 2 O(g) + CO(g)   H 2 (g) + CO 2 (g)    K  = 1 .6 FeO(s) + CO(g)   Fe(s) + CO 2 (g)      K  = 0 .67

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation: The equilibrium constant of the given reaction is to be calculated.

Concept introduction:

Equilibrium constant: It is the ratio of products to reactants has a constant value when the reaction is in equilibrium at a certain temperature. And it is represented by the letter K.

For a reaction,

  aA+bBcC+dD

The equilibrium constant is, K=[C]c[D]d[A]a[B]b, where,a, b, c and d are the stoichiometric coefficients of reactant and product in the reactions.

Explanation

The equilibrium constant of the given reaction is calculated.

Given,

The balanced chemical equation for the first reaction is,

  Fe(s)+H2O(g)FeO(s)+H2(g)                     (a)

The equilibrium constant, K1 for the reaction is,

  K1=[H2][H2O]

The balanced chemical equation for the second reaction is

  H2O(g)+CO(g)H2(g)+CO2(g)                    (b)

The equilibrium constant, K2 for the reaction is,

  K2=[H2][CO2][H2O][CO]=1

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