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College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300

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BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300
Textbook Problem

In 1865 Jules Verne proposed sending men to the Moon by firing a space capsule from a 220-m-long cannon with final speed of 10.97 km/s. What would have been the unrealistically large acceleration experienced by the space travelers during their launch? (A human can stand an acceleration of 15g for a short time.) Compare your answer with the free-fall acceleration, 9.80 m/s2.

To determine
The acceleration experienced by the space traveller.

Explanation

Given Info:

The initial velocity of the space traveller is 0

The final velocity of the space traveller is 10.97km/s

The displacement of the space traveller is 220m

Explanation:

The formula used to calculate the acceleration of the space traveller is,

a=v2v022Δx

  • Δx is the displacement of the space traveller
  • v is the final velocity of the space traveller
  • v0 is the initial velocity of the space traveller
  • a is the acceleration

Substitute 0 for v0 , 10.97km/s for vf and 220m for Δx to find a .

a=((10

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