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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

What mass of NaCl could be obtained by evaporating 1.0 L of seawater? (Note: The amount of Na+ ions in seawater limits the amount of NaCl that can be obtained.)

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

The mass of NaCl obtained by the evaporation of 1 L of sea water should be determined.

Concept introduction:

  • Molarity is one of the concentrations expressing terms and it is equal to the moles of solute divided by the liter of solution.

    Molarity(M)=MolesofsoluteLitersofsolution

  • Numberofmoles=MassingramsMolarmassofthesubstance
Explanation

Given,

The amount of sodium which is present in the sea water limits the amount of NaCl

The maximum number of NaCl obtained from 1.0L seawater sample is 0.460mol

The mass of this amount of NaCl can be determined as follows.

The mass of the substance can be determined by multiplying number of moles with its molar mass.

  (0.460mol/L)×(1

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