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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

Rates of decomposition can be measured based on decompositions per min. What is the ratio of the rates of decomposition of the two major uranium isotopes (rate for 238U /rate for 235U)?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation: To determine the ratio of the rates of decomposition of the two major isotopes namely, uranium–235 and uranium–238

Concept introduction:

Half–life period: It is the time required for the concentration of a substance to reduce to the one-half of its initial concentration.

The half–life period for first order reaction is as follows:

  t1/2=0.693kWhere,k = Rate constantt1/2= half-life

Explanation

Half–life of 235U is 7.038×109yr

Half–life of 238U is 4.468×1010yr

The half–life period for first order reaction is as follows:

  t1/2=0.693kWhere,k = Rate constantt1/2= half-life

The rate constant of 235U is calculated as follows:

  t1/2=0.693k7.038×109yr=0.693kk=9.8465×1011yr1

The rate constant of 238U is calculated as follows:

  t1/2=0

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