close solutoin list

Ethics in Action Danielle Hastings was recently hired as a cost analyst by CareNet Medical Supplies Inc. One of Danielle’s first assignments was to perform a net present value analysis for a new warehouse. Danielle performed the analysis and calculated a present value index of 0.75. The plant manager, Jerrod Moore, is intent on purchasing the warehouse because he believes that more storage space is needed. Jerrod asks Danielle to come to his office, where the following conversation takes place: Jerrod: Danielle, you’re new here, aren’t you? Danielle: Yes, I am. Jerrod: Well, Danielle, I’m not at all pleased with the capital investment analysis that you performed on this new warehouse. I need that warehouse for my production. If I don’t get it, where am I going to place our output? Danielle: Well, we need to get product into our customers’ hands. Jerrod : I agree, and we need a warehouse to do that. Danielle: My analysis does not support constructing a new warehouse. The numbers don’t lie; the warehouse does not meet our investment return targets. In fact, it seems to me that purchasing a warehouse does not add much value to the business. We need to be producing product to satisfy customer orders, not to fill a warehouse. Jerrod: The headquarters people will not allow me to build the warehouse if the numbers don’t add up. You know as well as I that many assumptions go into your net present value analysis. Why don’t you relax some of your assumptions so that the financial savings will offset the cost? Danielle: I’m willing to discuss my assumptions with you. Maybe I overlooked something. Jerrod: Good. Here’s what I want you to do. I see in your analysis that you don’t project greater sales as a result of the warehouse. It seems to me that if we can store more goods, we will have more to sell. Thus, logically, a larger warehouse translates into more sales. If you incorporate this into your analysis, I think you’ll see that the numbers will work out. Why don’t you work it through and come back with a new analysis. I’m really counting on you on this one. Let’s get off to a good start together and see if we can get this project accepted. What is your advice to Danielle?

BuyFind

Accounting

27th Edition
WARREN + 5 others
Publisher: Cengage Learning,
ISBN: 9781337272094
BuyFind

Accounting

27th Edition
WARREN + 5 others
Publisher: Cengage Learning,
ISBN: 9781337272094

Solutions

Chapter
Section
Chapter 26, Problem 26.1CP
Textbook Problem

Ethics in Action

Danielle Hastings was recently hired as a cost analyst by CareNet Medical Supplies Inc. One of Danielle’s first assignments was to perform a net present value analysis for a new warehouse. Danielle performed the analysis and calculated a present value index of 0.75. The plant manager, Jerrod Moore, is intent on purchasing the warehouse because he believes that more storage space is needed. Jerrod asks Danielle to come to his office, where the following conversation takes place:

Jerrod: Danielle, you’re new here, aren’t you?

Danielle: Yes, I am.

Jerrod: Well, Danielle, I’m not at all pleased with the capital investment analysis that you performed on this new warehouse. I need that warehouse for my production. If I don’t get it, where am I going to place our output?

Danielle: Well, we need to get product into our customers’ hands.

Jerrod: I agree, and we need a warehouse to do that.

Danielle: My analysis does not support constructing a new warehouse. The numbers don’t lie; the warehouse does not meet our investment return targets. In fact, it seems to me that purchasing a warehouse does not add much value to the business. We need to be producing product to satisfy customer orders, not to fill a warehouse.

Jerrod: The headquarters people will not allow me to build the warehouse if the numbers don’t add up. You know as well as I that many assumptions go into your net present value analysis. Why don’t you relax some of your assumptions so that the financial savings will offset the cost?

Danielle: I’m willing to discuss my assumptions with you. Maybe I overlooked something.

Jerrod: Good. Here’s what I want you to do. I see in your analysis that you don’t project greater sales as a result of the warehouse. It seems to me that if we can store more goods, we will have more to sell. Thus, logically, a larger warehouse translates into more sales. If you incorporate this into your analysis, I think you’ll see that the numbers will work out. Why don’t you work it through and come back with a new analysis. I’m really counting on you on this one. Let’s get off to a good start together and see if we can get this project accepted.

What is your advice to Danielle?

Expert Solution

Want to see this answer and more?

Bartleby provides explanations to thousands of textbook problems written by our experts, many with advanced degrees!

See solution

Chapter 26 Solutions

Accounting
Show all chapter solutions
Ch. 26 - What are the major advantages of leasing a fixed...Ch. 26 - Give an example of a qualitative factor that...Ch. 26 - How are investments in sustainability justified?Ch. 26 - Average rate of return Determine the average rate...Ch. 26 - Average rate of return Determine the average rate...Ch. 26 - Cash payback period A project has estimated annual...Ch. 26 - Cash payback period A project has estimated annual...Ch. 26 - Net present value A project has estimated annual...Ch. 26 - Net present value A project has estimated annual...Ch. 26 - Internal rate of return A project is estimated to...Ch. 26 - Internal rate of return A project is estimated to...Ch. 26 - Net present valueunequal lives Project A requires...Ch. 26 - Net present valueunequal lives Project 1 requires...Ch. 26 - Average rate of return The following data are...Ch. 26 - Average rate of returncost savings Midwest...Ch. 26 - Average rate of returnnew product Micro Tek Inc....Ch. 26 - Calculate cash flows Natures Way Inc. is planning...Ch. 26 - Cash payback period for a service company Prime...Ch. 26 - Cash payback method Lily Products Company is...Ch. 26 - Net present value method The following data are...Ch. 26 - Net present value method for a service company AM...Ch. 26 - Net present value methodannuity for a service...Ch. 26 - Net present value methodannuity Briggs Excavation...Ch. 26 - Net present value method for a service company...Ch. 26 - Present value index Dip N Dunk Doughnuts has...Ch. 26 - Net present value method and present value index...Ch. 26 - Average rate of return, cash payback period, net...Ch. 26 - Cash payback period, net present value analysis,...Ch. 26 - Internal rate of return method The internal rate...Ch. 26 - Internal rate of return method for a service...Ch. 26 - Internal rate of return methodtwo projects Munch N...Ch. 26 - Net present value method and internal rate of...Ch. 26 - Identify error in capital investment analysis...Ch. 26 - Net present valueunequal lives Bunker Hill Mining...Ch. 26 - Net present valueunequal lives Daisys Creamery...Ch. 26 - Sustainable energy capital investment analysis...Ch. 26 - Sustainable product capital investment analysis...Ch. 26 - Average rate of return method, net present value...Ch. 26 - Cash payback period, net present value method, and...Ch. 26 - Net present value method, present value index, and...Ch. 26 - Net present value method, internal rate of return...Ch. 26 - Alternative capital investments The investment...Ch. 26 - Capital rationing decision for a service company...Ch. 26 - Average rate of return method, net present value...Ch. 26 - Cash payback period, net present value method, and...Ch. 26 - Net present value method, present value index, and...Ch. 26 - Net present value method, internal rate of return...Ch. 26 - Alternative capital investments The investment...Ch. 26 - Capital rationing decision for a service company...Ch. 26 - Ethics in Action Danielle Hastings was recently...Ch. 26 - Communication Global Electronics Inc. invested...Ch. 26 - Personal investment analysis for a service company...Ch. 26 - Qualitative issues in investment analysis The...Ch. 26 - Net present value method for a service company...

Additional Business Textbook Solutions

Find more solutions based on key concepts
Show solutions
Explain why economists usually oppose controls on prices.

Principles of Macroeconomics (MindTap Course List)

How does the adoption of a JIT approach to manufacturing affect process costing?

Managerial Accounting: The Cornerstone of Business Decision-Making

PROJECT CASH FLOW Eisenhower Communications is trying to estimate the first-year cash flow (at Year 1) for a pr...

Fundamentals of Financial Management, Concise Edition (with Thomson ONE - Business School Edition, 1 term (6 months) Printed Access Card) (MindTap Course List)