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College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300

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BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300
Textbook Problem

A student throws a heavy red ball horizontally from a balcony of a tall building with an initial speed v0. At the same time, a second student drops a lighter blue ball from the same balcony. Neglecting air resistance, which statement is true? (a) The blue ball reaches the ground first, (b) The balls reach the ground at the same instant, (c) The red ball reaches the ground first, (d) Both balls hit the ground with the same speed, (e) None of statements(a) through(d) is true.

To determine
Which statement is true when a red ball is thrown horizontally from a balcony and a lighter blue ball is dropped from the same building.

Explanation

A projectile motion is similar to free fall in the sense that the only force acting on the body is gravity. As the motion is under the influence of gravity alone, the equations used in both cases can be similar. In both cases, the only acceleration acting is the acceleration due to gravity, directed vertically downwards.

The formula for time to reach the ground in a free fall is,

t=2hg

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