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Statistics for The Behavioral Scie...

10th Edition
Frederick J Gravetter + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305504912

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Section
BuyFindarrow_forward

Statistics for The Behavioral Scie...

10th Edition
Frederick J Gravetter + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305504912
Textbook Problem

Find the mean, median, and mode for the following

sample of scores:

6, 7, 3, 9, 8, 3, 7, 5

To determine

Find the mean, median and mode for the given sample of scores.

Explanation

Given:

The sample of scores:

3, 6, 7, 3, 9, 8, 3, 7, 5

Here n=9 is odd.

Formula used:

M=xn

Median=(n+12)thscore

Calculations:

To find mean, add all scores and divide the sum by number of scores in the sample.

M=xn=3+6+7+3+9+8+3+7+59=519=5.67

To find median, first arrange data in ascending order as shown below and then find the middle score.

3 3 3 5 6 7 7 8 9

For nine scores, the median would be (n+12)th=(9+12)th=5th score of the sorted data.

Median=(n+12)thscore=5thscore=6

The mode is most occurred score in the sample

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