BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry In Focus

7th Edition
Tro + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning,
ISBN: 9781337399692

Solutions

Chapter
Section
BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry In Focus

7th Edition
Tro + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning,
ISBN: 9781337399692
Chapter 3, Problem 41E
Textbook Problem
136 views

A fictitious element has two naturally occurring isotopes and has an atomic mass of 29 .5 amu .

a. If the natural abundance of isotope 1 is 33 .7%, what is the natural abundance of isotope 2?

b. If the mass of isotope 2 is 30 .0 amu, what is the mass of isotope 1?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

The natural abundance of isotope 2 and the mass of isotope 1 of fictitious element are to be calculated.

Concept Introduction:

 Atomic mass is defined as the mass of an atom. It is a characteristic of an element. It can be a whole number or fractional. Its unit is amu.

 An element can have more than one form of atoms. These forms differ in the number of neutrons contained in the nucleus, while the number of protons is same. These are termed as isotopes.

 As these isotopes are the atoms of the same element, the actual atomic mass depends on the natural abundance of the isotopes of that element. The total natural abundance of all the isotopes of an element is 100.

Explanation of Solution

a) The natural abundance of isotope 2.

The natural abundance of isotope 2 can be calculated as:

The total abundance of isotope 1 and 2 of the fictitious element is 100.0 %.

The natural abundance of isotope 1 is 33.7 %.

Hence, the natural abundance of isotope 2 is the difference of both the above values.

Natural abundance of isotope 2=100 % - 33.7 %=66.3 %

b) The mass of isotope 1.

The mass of isotope 1 is calculated as:

Atomic mass of isotope 1 of the element is given by the expression given below:

Atomic mass =Mass of isotope×Natural abundance (%)100

Substitute the values of mass of isotope and its natural abundance in the above equation.

Atomic mass of fictitious element=(Atomic mass of isotope 1×33.7)+(30.0 amu×66.3)100                                     29.5 amu=(Atomic mass of isotope 1×33

Still sussing out bartleby?

Check out a sample textbook solution.

See a sample solution

The Solution to Your Study Problems

Bartleby provides explanations to thousands of textbook problems written by our experts, many with advanced degrees!

Get Started

Chapter 3 Solutions

Chemistry In Focus
Show all chapter solutions
add
Ch. 3 - Based on their electron configurations, which of...Ch. 3 - Which pair of elements do you expect to be most...Ch. 3 - Which statement is true of the quantum mechanical...Ch. 3 - Why is it important to understand atoms?Ch. 3 - Describe an atom.Ch. 3 - What defines an element? How many naturally...Ch. 3 - List three different ways that chemical elements...Ch. 3 - Use the periodic table to write the name and the...Ch. 3 - Define each term: a. atomic number b. mass number...Ch. 3 - Write the mass and charge of the proton, neutron,...Ch. 3 - What is the periodic law?Ch. 3 - What was Mendeleevs largest contribution to the...Ch. 3 - Explain the Bohr model for the atom. How does the...Ch. 3 - Explain the quantum mechanical model for the atom....Ch. 3 - Give two examples of each: a. alkali metal b....Ch. 3 - Which elements exist as diatomic molecules?Ch. 3 - Explain the difference and similarity between...Ch. 3 - Determine the charge of each ion: a rubidium atom...Ch. 3 - Determine the charge of each of the following: a...Ch. 3 - Determine the number of protons and electrons in...Ch. 3 - Determine the number of protons and electrons in...Ch. 3 - Give the atomic number (Z) and the mass number (A)...Ch. 3 - Give the atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) for...Ch. 3 - The following isotopes have applications in...Ch. 3 - The following isotopes are important in nuclear...Ch. 3 - 14C is used in carbon dating of artifacts....Ch. 3 - 40K is used to measure the age of Earth. Determine...Ch. 3 - Determine the number of protons, neutrons, and...Ch. 3 - Determine the number of protons, neutrons, and...Ch. 3 - Give electron configurations according to the Bohr...Ch. 3 - Give electron configurations according to the Bohr...Ch. 3 - How many valence electrons are in each of the...Ch. 3 - How many valence electrons are in each element of...Ch. 3 - Draw electron configurations for each of the...Ch. 3 - Draw electron configurations for each of the...Ch. 3 - Which two of the following elements would you...Ch. 3 - Group the following elements into three similar...Ch. 3 - We have seen that the reactivity of an element is...Ch. 3 - What is the electron configuration of Mg2+? How...Ch. 3 - Classify each of the following elements as a...Ch. 3 - Classify each of the following as a metal, a...Ch. 3 - Calculate the atomic mass of neon (Ne), which is...Ch. 3 - An element has two naturally occurring isotopes....Ch. 3 - A fictitious element has two naturally occurring...Ch. 3 - Copper has two naturally occurring isotopes. Cu-63...Ch. 3 - How many moles of titanium are present in 124 g of...Ch. 3 - How many moles of carbon are there in a diamond...Ch. 3 - How many moles are there in each sample? a. 45 mg...Ch. 3 - How many moles are there in each sample? a. 55.0 g...Ch. 3 - What is the mass of each sample? a.1.8 mol S...Ch. 3 - What is the mass of each sample? a.2.75 mol Fe...Ch. 3 - Determine the number of atoms in each sample....Ch. 3 - Determine the number of atoms in each sample....Ch. 3 - How many Ag atoms are present in a piece of pure...Ch. 3 - How many platinum atoms are in a pure platinum...Ch. 3 - A pure gold necklace has a volume of 1.8cm3. How...Ch. 3 - A titanium bicycle component has a volume of...Ch. 3 - An iron sphere has a radius of 3.4 cm. How many...Ch. 3 - Calculate the number of atoms in the universe. The...Ch. 3 - The introduction to this chapter states that...Ch. 3 - Suppose the absolute value of the charge of the...Ch. 3 - When we refer to doughnuts or cookies, we often...Ch. 3 - Draw 101 squares on a piece of paper and time...Ch. 3 - Why does Avogadros number have such an odd value?...Ch. 3 - Can you think of anything that is not composed of...Ch. 3 - Explain the connection between the properties of...Ch. 3 - Read the interest box in this chapter entitled...Ch. 3 - Here are three fictitious elements and a molecular...Ch. 3 - Read the box entitled What if . . . Complexity Out...Ch. 3 - Gather any two of the following items, measure...

Additional Science Textbook Solutions

Find more solutions based on key concepts
Show solutions add
All of the following are health risks associated with excessive body fat except. a. respiratory problems b. sle...

Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies - Standalone book (MindTap Course List)

Did Pangea or Gondwana form first?

BIOLOGY:CONCEPTS+APPL.(LOOSELEAF)

An athlete jumping vertically on a trampoline leaves the surface with a velocity of 8.5 m/s upward. What maximu...

Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Technology Update (No access codes included)

A viroid consists entirely of __________. a. DMA b. RNA c. protein d. lipids

Biology: The Unity and Diversity of Life (MindTap Course List)

What causes a storm surge? Why is a storm surge so dangerous?

Oceanography: An Invitation To Marine Science, Loose-leaf Versin