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College Physics

1st Edition
Paul Peter Urone + 1 other
ISBN: 9781938168000

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BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

1st Edition
Paul Peter Urone + 1 other
ISBN: 9781938168000
Textbook Problem

Explain why patterns observed in the periodic table of the elements are evidence for the existence of atoms, and why Brownian motion is a more direct type of evidence for their existence.

To determine

To Explain:

Why patterns observed in the periodic table of the elements are evidence for the existence of atoms, and why Brownian motion is more direct type of evidence for their existence.

Explanation

Introduction:

Atom is defined as the smallest constituent of matter. Every solid, liquid, gas and plasma are made up of atoms, which can be either neutral or ionized.

The pattern observed in the periodic table of the elements are evidence for the existence of atoms. This is possible only when the fundamental building blocks of elements have related properties. These fundamental blocks are atoms.

Brownian motion is defined as the random movement of particles of fluid due to the collision with the particles floating in the fluid...

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