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College Physics

1st Edition
Paul Peter Urone + 1 other
ISBN: 9781938168000

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Section
BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

1st Edition
Paul Peter Urone + 1 other
ISBN: 9781938168000
Textbook Problem

Integrated Concepts

(a) An excimer laser used for vision correction emits 193-nm UV. Calculate the photon energy in eV.

(b) These photons are used to evaporate corneal tissue, which is very similar to water in its properties. Calculate the amount of energy needed per molecule of water to make the phase change from liquid to gas. That is, divide the heat of vaporization in kJ/kg by the number of water molecules in a kilogram.

(c) Convert this to eV and compare to the photon energy. Discuss the implications.

To determine

(a)

The photon energy ineVof wavelength193nm.

Explanation

Given info:

Wavelength of photon is,λ=193nm.

Formula used:

Formula for the energy of the photons is,

E=hcλ

Calculation:

Substituting the given values in the above equation, we get

E=6.626×1034Js×3

To determine

(b)

The amount of energy needed per molecule of water to make the phase change from liquid to gas.

To determine

(c)

The amount of energy needed per molecule of water to make phase change ineVand comparison of this energy with photon energy.

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