BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300

Solutions

Chapter
Section
BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300
Textbook Problem

If an object is in equilibrium, which of the following statements is not true? (a) The speed of the object remains constant. (b) The acceleration of the object is zero. (c) The net force acting on the object is zero. (d) The object must be at rest. (e) The velocity is constant.

(a)

To determine

To say True or False: The speed of the object remains constant.

Explanation
The net force is zero. Therefore, acceleration is equal to zero. The change in velocity can be expressed as,

dv=(a)dt

  • a is the acceleration
  • dt is the change in time

Substitute 0 for a in the expression for the change in velocity

(b)

To determine

To say True or False: The acceleration of the object is zero.

(c)

To determine

To say True or False: The net force acting on the object is zero.

(d)

To determine

To say True or False: The object must be at rest.

(e)

To determine

To say True or False: The velocity is constant.

Still sussing out bartleby?

Check out a sample textbook solution.

See a sample solution

The Solution to Your Study Problems

Bartleby provides explanations to thousands of textbook problems written by our experts, many with advanced degrees!

Get Started

Additional Science Solutions

Find more solutions based on key concepts

Show solutions add

This class will give you the skills to learn how to separate legitimate nutrition claims from those that are qu...

Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies - Standalone book (MindTap Course List)

The freezing point of water is _________ K.

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation

Step-by-step, explain how energy flows from the center of the Sun to Earth.

Horizons: Exploring the Universe (MindTap Course List)

What is a chemical reaction?

Biology: The Dynamic Science (MindTap Course List)

Define the term biocompatibility.

Chemistry for Engineering Students