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College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300

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College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300
Textbook Problem

On an airplane’s takeoff, the combined action of the air around the engines and wings of an airplane exerts an 8 000-N force on the plane, directed upward at an angle of 65.0° above the horizontal. The plane rises with constant velocity in the vertical direction while continuing to accelerate in the horizontal direction. (a) What is the weight of the plane? (b) What is its horizontal acceleration?

(a)

To determine
The weight of the plane.

Explanation

Given Info: Force (F) exerted by the wings 8000 N. The angle between the wings and the horizon is 65ο .

The free body diagram is given below.

From the diagram, the weight of the plane is,

W=Fsin65ο

Substitute 8000 N for F in the above equation to get W

(b)

To determine
The horizontal acceleration.

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