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Biology: The Dynamic Science (Mind...

4th Edition
Peter J. Russell + 2 others
ISBN: 9781305389892

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Chapter
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BuyFindarrow_forward

Biology: The Dynamic Science (Mind...

4th Edition
Peter J. Russell + 2 others
ISBN: 9781305389892
Textbook Problem

In 2003, Michelle Khan and her coworkers published their findings on a 10-year study in which they followed cervical cancer incidence and human papillomavirus (HPV) status in 20,514 women. All women who participated in the study were free of cervical cancer when the test began. Papanicolaou (Pap) tests were taken at regular intervals, and the researchers used a DNA probe hybridization test to detect the presence of specific types of HPV in the women’s cervical cells.

The results are shown as a graph of the incidence rate of cervical cancer by HPV type (Figure). Women who are HPV positive are often infected by more than one type, so the data were sorted into groups based on the women’s HPV status ranked by type: either positive for HPV16; or negative for HPV16 and positive for HPV18; or negative for HPV16/18 and positive for any other cancer-causing HPV; or negative for all cancer-causing HPV.

Chapter 45, Problem 4ITD, In 2003, Michelle Khan and her coworkers published their findings on a 10-year study in which they

FIGURE Cumulative incidence rate of cervical cancer correlated with HPV status in 20,514 women ages 16 years and older.

Do these data support the conclusion that being infected with HPV16 or HPV18 raises the risk of cervical cancer?

Source: Based on M. J. Khan et al. 2005. The elevated 10-year risk of cervical neoplasia in women with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 or 18 and the possible utility of type-specific HPV testing in clinical practice. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 97:1072–1079.

Summary Introduction

To review:

The conclusion that the women infected with HPV16 and HPV18 have a high risk of cervical cancer. The given graph provides information about the correlation between the cumulative incidence rate of cervical cancer and the HPV (Human Papillomavirus) status.

Biology: The Dynamic Science (MindTap Course List), Chapter 45, Problem 4ITD

Introduction:

Cervical cancer occurs in the cervix, a narrow opening into the uterus of the human female. The cancer cells divide intensely, form a solid tumor, and affect the other cells as well. Cervical cancer is very common in women. HPV is most commonly transmitted through infection and it also causes genital warts.

Explanation

HPV is a group of related viruses. The viruses are designated with certain numbers, which are HPV types. A study regarding the incidence of cervical cancer and presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) is carried out in 20,514 women. The Papanicolaou (Pap) test is carried out for cervical cancer. DNA probe hybridization is carried out to detect the specific type of HPV in the cervical cells of women...

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