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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

A 237-g piece of molybdenum, initially at 100.0 °C, is dropped into 244 g of water at 10.0 °C. When the system comes to thermal equilibrium, the temperature is 15.3 °C. What is the specific heat capacity of molybdenum?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

At thermal equilibrium, the specific heat capacity for a given mass of molybdenum placed in a beaker containing water has to be determined.

Concept Introduction:

Heat energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of substance by 1k.Energy gained or lost can be calculated using the below equation.

  q=C×m×ΔT

Where,

  q= energy gained or lost for a given mass of substance (m),

  C =specific heat capacity

  ΔT= change in temperature

Explanation

Given,

Mass of Mo=237g

Mass of water=244g

Assume the sum of qMo and qwater =0

  [Cwater×Mwater(Tfinal-Tinitial)]+[CMo×M

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