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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

The enthalpy of reaction of guncotton depends on the degree of nitration of the cellulose. For a particular sample, when 0.725 g of guncotton is decomposed in a bomb calorimeter, the temperature of the system increases by 1.32 K. Assuming the bomb has a heat capacity of 691 J/K and the calorimeter contains 1.200 kg of water, what is the energy of reaction per gram of guncotton?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

The energy of the reaction per gram of guncotton has to be calculated.

Concept Introduction:

Heat energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of substance by 1k.

Energy gained or lost can be calculated using the below equation.

  q = C × m × ΔT

Where,

  q = energy gained or lost for a given mass of substance (m)

  C =specific heat capacity,

  ΔT= change in temperature.

Explanation

Given,

Mass of guncotton is 0.725g

Amount of water in calorimeter is 1.2kg

The change in the temperature is 1.32K

Specific heat capacity of water is 4.184Jg.K 

Substitute in equation q=C×m×ΔT, as

The energy produced is q=C×m×ΔT+heatcapacityof bomb×ΔT

  q=-[4.184J/g.K×1.200×1031

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