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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

On the basis of this analysis and assuming the same price per liter, which fuel will propel your car farther? Which will produce less greenhouse gas?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

Based on the analysis, the fuel which propels the car and the car which produces less greenhouse gas has to be identified.

Concept Introduction:

Heat energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of substance by 1k.Energy gained or lost can be calculated using the below equation.

  q=C×m×ΔT

Where,

  q= energy gained or lost for a given mass of substance (m),

  C =specific heat capacity

  ΔT= change in temperature

Greenhouse gas

A greenhouse gas is a gas that absorbs infrared radiation and radiates heat in all directions. This increase in heat is called the greenhouse effect. Common examples of greenhouse gases, listed in order of abundance, include: water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and any fluorocarbons.

Explanation

Octane will propel for the same price per liter and will produce less CO2

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