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College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300

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BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300
Textbook Problem

A coin rests 15.0 cm from the center of a turntable. The coefficient of static friction between the coin and turntable surface is 0.350. The turntable starts from rest at t = 0 and rotates with a constant angular acceleration of 0.730 rad/s2.

(a) Once the turntable starts to rotate, what force causes the centripetal acceleration when the coin is stationary relative to the turntable? Under what condition does the coin begin to move relative to the turntable? (b) After what period of time will the coin start to slip on the turntable?

(a)

To determine
The force causing the centripetal acceleration.

Explanation

The coin moves when the maximum force of static friction is reached. The condition for relative motion of the coin with respect to the table is,

ω2r>μsg

  • ω is the angular speed

(b)

To determine
The time period after which the coin slips on the table.

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