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The spotlight effect refers to overestimating the extent to which others notice your appearance or behavior, especially when you commit a social faux pas. Effectively, you feel as if you are suddenly standing in a spotlight with everyone looking. In one demonstra­tion of this phenomenon, Gilovich, Medvec, and Sav­itsky (2000) asked college students to put on a Barry Manilow T-shirt that fellow students had previously judged to be embarrassing. The participants were then led into a room in which other students were already participating in an experiment. After a few minutes, the participant was led back out of the room and was allowed to remove the shirt. Later, each participant was asked to estimate how many people in the room had noticed the shirt. The individuals who were in the room were also asked whether they noticed the shirt. In the study, the participants significantly overestimat­ed the actual number of people who had noticed. a. In a similar study using a sample of n = 9 partici­pants, the individuals who wore the shirt produced an average estimate of M = 6.4 with SS = 162. The average number who said they noticed was 3.1. Is the estimate from the participants signifi­cantly different from the actual number? Test the null hypothesis that the true mean is μ – 3.1 using a two-tailed test with α = .05. b. Is the estimate from the participants significantly higher than the actual number (μ = 3.1)? Use a one-tailed test with α = .05.

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Essentials of Statistics for the B...

8th Edition
Frederick J Gravetter + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781133956570
BuyFind

Essentials of Statistics for the B...

8th Edition
Frederick J Gravetter + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781133956570

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Chapter
Section
Chapter 9, Problem 11P
Textbook Problem

The spotlight effect refers to overestimating the extent to which others notice your appearance or behavior, especially when you commit a social faux pas. Effectively, you feel as if you are suddenly standing in a spotlight with everyone looking. In one demonstra­tion of this phenomenon, Gilovich, Medvec, and Sav­itsky (2000) asked college students to put on a Barry Manilow T-shirt that fellow students had previously judged to be embarrassing. The participants were then led into a room in which other students were already participating in an experiment. After a few minutes, the participant was led back out of the room and was allowed to remove the shirt. Later, each participant was asked to estimate how many people in the room had noticed the shirt. The individuals who were in the room were also asked whether they noticed the shirt. In the study, the participants significantly overestimat­ed the actual number of people who had noticed.

a. In a similar study using a sample of n = 9 partici­pants, the individuals who wore the shirt produced an average estimate of M = 6.4 with SS = 162. The average number who said they noticed was 3.1. Is the estimate from the participants signifi­cantly different from the actual number? Test the null hypothesis that the true mean is μ – 3.1 using a two-tailed test with α = .05.

b. Is the estimate from the participants significantly higher than the actual number (μ = 3.1)? Use a one-tailed test with α = .05.

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