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Fundamentals of Physical Geography

2nd Edition
James Petersen
ISBN: 9781133606536

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Fundamentals of Physical Geography

2nd Edition
James Petersen
ISBN: 9781133606536
Textbook Problem

How are productivity, energy flow, and biomass related to the sequence of trophic levels in a food chain?

To determine

The way in which the productivity, energy flow, and biomass related to the sequence of trophic levels in a food chain.

Explanation

The various sequences of feeding levels in an ecosystem are known as a food chain. The organisms are plotted in different tropic levels in a sequence according to their eating habits. The first tropic level is with producers followed by herbivores in the second tropic level, carnivores in the third tropic level and finally decomposers in the fourth tropic level.

The energy to any ecosystem is provided by the Sunlight. It is used by the plants for the process of photosynthesis. The total amount of living material in an ecosystem is referred to as its biomass. In any ecosystem, the energy is stored in the biomass. Thus, the biomass of each tropic level traces out the energy flow through the ecosystem.

When the energy is transferred to one organism to the other, it changes its state. According to the second law of thermodynamics, the transformation of energy from one form to the other form involves in the dissipation of energy in the form of heat...

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