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Finite Mathematics

7th Edition
Stefan Waner + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781337280426

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Finite Mathematics

7th Edition
Stefan Waner + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781337280426
Chapter A, Problem 22E
Textbook Problem
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Let p: “Willis is a good teacher,” q: “Carla is a good teacher,” r: “Willis’ students hate math,” and s: “Carla’s students hate math.” Express the statements in Exercises 17–24 in words.

( s ) ( r )

To determine

The meaning of the statement (s)(r) in words, if the statements are,

Statement p: Willis is a good teacher.

Statement q: Carla is a good teacher.

Statement r: Willis’ students hate math.

Statement s: Carla’s students hate math.

Explanation of Solution

Given Information:

The provided statements are,

Statement p: Willis is a good teacher.

Statement q: Carla is a good teacher.

Statement r: Willis’ students hate math.

Statement s: Carla’s students hate math.

Consider the provided statements,

Statement p says “Willis is a good teacher”.

Statement q says “Carla is a good teacher”.

Statement r says “Willis’ students hate math”.

Statement s says “Carla’s students hate math”.

The not statement of s, that is, s will be “Carla’s students do not hate math”.

The not statement of r, that is, r will be “Willis’ students do not hate math”.

The symbol implies disjunction which means that if either of the two statements is true or both statements are true then the conclusion of the statements will be true

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Chapter A Solutions

Finite Mathematics
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