Organic Chemistry (9th Edition) - 9th Edition - by Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek - ISBN 9780321971371
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Organic Chemistry (9th Edition)
9th Edition
Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek
Publisher: PEARSON
ISBN: 9780321971371

Solutions for Organic Chemistry (9th Edition)

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Chapter 1.16 - Drawing Three-dimensional MoleculesChapter 1.17 - General Rules Of Hybridization And GeometryChapter 1.18B - Rigidity Of Double BondsChapter 1.19B - StereoisomersChapter 2 - Acids And Bases; Functional GroupsChapter 2.1A - Bond Dipole MomentsChapter 2.1B - Molecular Dipole MomentsChapter 2.2C - Hydrogen BondingChapter 2.3 - Polarity Effects On SolubilitiesChapter 2.4 - Arrhenius Acids And BasesChapter 2.6A - Acids StrengthChapter 2.7 - Equilibrium Positions Of Acid-base ReactionsChapter 2.8 - Solvent Effects On Acidity And BasicityChapter 2.10 - Inductive Effects On AcidityChapter 2.11 - Hybridization Effects On AcidityChapter 2.12 - Resonance Effects On Acidity And BasicityChapter 2.14 - The Curved-arrow FormalismChapter 2.15D - Aromatic HydrocarbonsChapter 2.16D - Carboxylic AcidsChapter 2.17C - NitrilesChapter 3 - Structure And Stereochemistry Of AlkanesChapter 3.2 - Molecular Formulas Of AlkanesChapter 3.3B - Iupac Or Systematic NamesChapter 3.4C - Melting Points Of AlkanesChapter 3.7B - Conformations Of EthaneChapter 3.7C - Conformations Of PropaneChapter 3.8B - Steric StrainChapter 3.9 - Conformations Of Higher AlkanesChapter 3.10C - Nomenclature Of CycloalkanesChapter 3.11 - Cis-trans Isomerism In CycloalkanesChapter 3.12B - CyclopropaneChapter 3.12C - CyclobutaneChapter 3.13B - Axial And Equatorial PositionsChapter 3.14 - Conformations Of Monosubstituted CyclohexanesChapter 3.15 - Conformations Of Disubstituted CyclohexanesChapter 3.15A - Substituents Of Different SizesChapter 3.15B - Extremely Bulky GroupsChapter 3.16A - Nomenclature Of Bicyclic AlkanesChapter 3.16B - Cis- And Trans-decalinChapter 4 - The Study Of Chemical ReactionsChapter 4.3A - The Initiation Step: Generation Of RadicalsChapter 4.3B - Propagation StepsChapter 4.3C - Termination ReactionsChapter 4.4 - Equilibrium Constants And Free EnergyChapter 4.5B - EntropyChapter 4.7 - Enthalpy Changes In ChlorinationChapter 4.8 - Kinetics And The Rate EquationChapter 4.10 - Transition StatesChapter 4.12 - Temperature Dependence Of HalogenationChapter 4.13A - Chlorination Of Propane: Product RatiosChapter 4.13B - Free-radical StabilitiesChapter 4.14 - Hammond's PostulateChapter 4.15 - Radical InhibitorsChapter 4.16A - CarbocationsChapter 4.16B - Free RadicalsChapter 4.16C - CarbanionsChapter 4.16D - CarbenesChapter 5 - StereochemistryChapter 5.2 - ChiralityChapter 5.2A - Chirality And Enantiomers In Organic MoleculesChapter 5.2B - Asymmetric Carbon Atoms, Chiral Centers, And StereocentersChapter 5.2C - Mirror Planes Of SymmetryChapter 5.3 - (r) And (s) Nomenclature Of Asymmetric Carbon AtomsChapter 5.4D - Specific RotationChapter 5.5 - Biological Discrimination Of EnantiomersChapter 5.7 - Enantiomeric Excess And Optical PurityChapter 5.8 - Chirality Of Conformationally Mobile SystemsChapter 5.9B - AllenesChapter 5.10A - Drawing Fischer ProjectionsChapter 5.10B - Drawing Mirror Images Of Fischer ProjectionsChapter 5.10C - Assigning (r) And (s) Configurations From Fischer ProjectionsChapter 5.11C - Diastereomers Of Molecules With Two Or More Chiral CentersChapter 5.13 - Meso CompoundsChapter 5.15 - Physical Properties Of DiastereomersChapter 5.16A - Chemical Resolution Of EnantiomersChapter 6 - Alkyl Halides; Nucleophilic SubstitutionChapter 6.1 - IntroductionChapter 6.2 - Nomenclature Of Alkyl HalidesChapter 6.3E - PesticidesChapter 6.4 - Structure Of Alkyl HalidesChapter 6.5A - Boiling PointsChapter 6.5B - DensitiesChapter 6.6B - Allylic BrominationChapter 6.7 - Reactions Of Alkyl Halides: Substitution And EliminationChapter 6.8 - Biomolecular Nucleophilic Substitution: The Sn2 ReactionChapter 6.9 - Generality Of The Sn2 ReactionChapter 6.10A - Steric Effects Of NucleophilicityChapter 6.11A - Leaving-group Effects On The SubstrateChapter 6.11B - Steric Effects On The SubstrateChapter 6.12 - Stereochemistry Of The Sn2 ReactionChapter 6.13 - Unimolecular Nucleophilic Substitution: The Sn1 ReactionChapter 6.13B - Leaving-group EffectsChapter 6.15 - Rearrangements In Sn1 ReactionsChapter 6.16 - Comparison Of Sn1 And Sn2 ReactionsChapter 7 - Structure And Synthesis Of Alkenes; EliminationChapter 7.3A - Elements Of Unsaturation In HydrocarbonsChapter 7.3B - Elements Of Unsaturation With HeteroatomsChapter 7.4 - Nomenclature Of AlkenesChapter 7.5B - E-z NomenclatureChapter 7.6 - Commercial Importance Of AlkenesChapter 7.7B - PolarityChapter 7.8B - Substitution EffectsChapter 7.8C - Energy Difference In Cis-trans IsomersChapter 7.8E - Bredt's RuleChapter 7.8F - Enhanced Stability Of Conjugated Double BondsChapter 7.10 - Unimolecular Elimination: The E1 ReactionChapter 7.10A - Competition Between The E1 And Sn1Chapter 7.10C - Rearrangements In E1 ReactionsChapter 7.11 - Positional Orientation Of Elimination: Zaitsev's RuleChapter 7.12 - Bimolecular Elimination: The E2 ReactionChapter 7.13 - Bulky Bases In E2 Eliminations; Hofmann OrientationChapter 7.14B - Stereospecific E2 ReactionsChapter 7.15 - E2 Reactions In Cyclohexane SystemsChapter 7.16 - Comparison Of E1 And E2 Elimination MechanismsChapter 7.17B - Unimolecular Substitution Versus Elimination (weak Base Or Nucleophile)Chapter 7.18 - Alkene Synthesis By Dehydration Of AlcoholsChapter 7.19B - Dehydrogenation Of AlkanesChapter 8 - Reactions Of AlkenesChapter 8.3A - Orientation Of Addition: Markovnikov's RuleChapter 8.3B - Free-radical Addition Of Hbr: Anti-markovnikov AdditionChapter 8.4B - Orientation Of HydrationChapter 8.6 - Alkoxymercuration-demercurationChapter 8.7A - Mechanism Of HydroborationChapter 8.7C - Stereochemistry Of HydroborationChapter 8.8B - Stereochemistry Of Halogen AdditionChapter 8.9 - Formation Of HalohydrinsChapter 8.10 - Catalytic Hydrogenation Of AlkenesChapter 8.11A - The Simmons-smith ReactionChapter 8.11B - Formation Of Carbenes By Alpha EliminationChapter 8.12 - Epoxidation Of AlkenesChapter 8.13 - Acid-catalyzed Opening Of EpoxidesChapter 8.14C - Choosing A ReagentChapter 8.15B - OzonolysisChapter 8.15C - Comparison Of Permanganate Cleavage And OzonolysisChapter 8.16A - Cationic PolymerizationChapter 8.16B - Free-radical PolymerizationChapter 8.16C - Anionic PolymerizationChapter 8.17B - Mechanism Of Olefin MetathesisChapter 9 - AlkynesChapter 9.1 - IntroductionChapter 9.2 - Nomenclature Of AlkynesChapter 9.4B - Manufacture Of AcetyleneChapter 9.6 - Acidity Of Alkynes; Formation Of Acetylide IonsChapter 9.7A - Alkylation Of Acetylide IonsChapter 9.7B - Addition Of Acetylide Ions To Carbonyl GroupsChapter 9.8 - Synthesis Of Alkynes By Elimination ReactionsChapter 9.9C - Metal-ammonia Reduction To Trans AlkenesChapter 9.9D - Addition Of HalogensChapter 9.9E - Addition Of Hydrogen HalidesChapter 9.9F - Hydration Of Alkynes To Ketones And AldehydesChapter 9.10A - Permanganate OxidationsChapter 9.10B - OzonolysisChapter 10 - Structure And Synthesis Of AlcoholsChapter 10.3A - Iupac Names ("alkanol" Names)Chapter 10.3B - Common Names Of AlcoholsChapter 10.3C - Names Of DiolsChapter 10.4B - Solubility Properties Of AlcoholsChapter 10.6A - Effects On AcidityChapter 10.6C - Acidity Of PhenolsChapter 10.8B - Organolithium ReagentsChapter 10.9A - Addition Of Formaldehdye: Formation Of Primary AlcoholsChapter 10.9B - Addition To Aldehydes: Formation Of Secondary AlcoholsChapter 10.9C - Addition To Ketones: Formation Of Tertiary AlcoholsChapter 10.9D - Addition To Acid Chlorides And EstersChapter 10.9E - Ring-opening With Ethylene OxideChapter 10.9F - Lithium DialkylcupratesChapter 10.10A - Reactions With Acidic CompoundsChapter 10.10B - Reactions With Electrophilic Multiple BondsChapter 10.11B - Uses Of Lithium Aluminium HydrideChapter 10.12 - Thiols (mercaptans)Chapter 11 - Reactions Of AlcoholsChapter 11.1 - Oxidation States Of Alcohols And Related Functional GroupsChapter 11.2C - Resistance Of Tertiary Alcohols To OxidationChapter 11.3 - Additional Methods For Oxidizing AlcoholsChapter 11.4 - Biological Oxidation Of AlcoholsChapter 11.5 - Alcohols As Nucleophiles And Electrophiles; Formation Of TosylatesChapter 11.6 - Reduction Of AlcoholsChapter 11.7A - Reactions With Hydrobromic AcidChapter 11.7B - Reactions With Hydrochloric AcidChapter 11.7C - Limitations On The Use Of Hydrohalic Acids With AlcoholsChapter 11.8 - Reactions Of Alcohols With Phosphorus HalidesChapter 11.9 - Reactions Of Alcohols With Thionyl ChlorideChapter 11.10A - Formation Of AlkenesChapter 11.10B - Bimolecular Condensation To Form Ethers (industrial)Chapter 11.11A - The Pinacol RearrangementChapter 11.11B - Periodic Acid Cleavage Of GlycolsChapter 11.12 - Esterification Of AlcoholsChapter 11.13A - Sulfate EstersChapter 11.14 - Reactions Of AlkoxidesChapter 12 - Infrared Spectroscopy And Mass SpectrometryChapter 12.3 - The Infrared RegionChapter 12.5 - Ir-active And Ir-inactive VibrationsChapter 12.7C - Interpreting The Ir Spectra Of HydrocarbonsChapter 12.9A - Simple Ketones, Aldehydes, And AcidsChapter 12.10 - Characteristic Absorptions Of Cn BondsChapter 12.12 - Reading And Interpreting Ir Spectra (solved Problems)Chapter 12.14B - Use Of Heavier Isotope PeaksChapter 12.15A - Mass Spectra Of AlkanesChapter 12.15B - Fragmentation Giving Resonance-stabilized CationsChapter 12.15C - Fragmentation Splitting Out A Small Molecule; Mass Spectra Of AlcoholsChapter 13 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance SpectroscopyChapter 13.5A - Measurement Of Chemical ShiftsChapter 13.5B - Characteristic Values Of Chemical ShiftsChapter 13.6 - The Number Of SignalsChapter 13.7 - Areas Of The PeaksChapter 13.8C - The Range Of Magnetic CouplingChapter 13.8D - Coupling ConstantsChapter 13.9 - Complex SplittingChapter 13.10 - Stereochemical Nonequivalence Of ProtonsChapter 13.11B - Fast Proton TransfersChapter 13.12E - Spin-spin SplittingChapter 13.12F - Dept 13c NmrChapter 13.13 - Interpreting Carbon Nmr SpectraChapter 13.14 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ImagingChapter 14 - Ethers, Epoxides, And ThioethersChapter 14.2C - Ethers As Polar SolventsChapter 14.2D - Stable Complexes Of Ethers With ReagentsChapter 14.3B - Iupac Names (alkoxy Alkane Names)Chapter 14.3C - Nomenclature Of Cyclic EthersChapter 14.4 - Spectroscopy Of EthersChapter 14.5 - The Williamson Ether SynthesisChapter 14.6 - Synthesis Of Ethers By Alkoxymercuration-demercurationChapter 14.7 - Industrial Synthesis: Bimolecular Condensation Of AlcoholsChapter 14.8 - Cleavage Of Ethers By Hbr And HiChapter 14.10A - Thioethers (sulfides)Chapter 14.10B - Silyl Ethers As Alcohol-protecting GroupsChapter 14.11B - Base-promoted Cyclization Of HalohydrinsChapter 14.12 - Acid-catalyzed Ring Opening Of EpoxidesChapter 14.13 - Base-catalyzed Ring Opening Of EpoxidesChapter 14.14 - Orientation Of Epoxide Ring OpeningChapter 14.15 - Reactions Of Epoxides With Grignard And Organolithium ReagentsChapter 15 - Conjugated Systems, Orbital Symmetry, And Ultraviolet SpectroscopyChapter 15.2 - Stabilities Of DienesChapter 15.4 - Allylic CationsChapter 15.5 - 1,2- And 1,4-addition Of Conjugated DienesChapter 15.6 - Kinetic Versus Thermodynamic Control In The Addition Of Hbr To Buta-1,3-dieneChapter 15.7 - Allylic RadicalsChapter 15.9 - Electronic Configurations Of The Allyl Radical, Cation, And AnionChapter 15.10 - Sn2 Displacement Reactions Of Allylic Halides And TosylatesChapter 15.11 - The Diels-alder ReactionChapter 15.11A - Stereochemical Requirements Of The Diels-alder Transition StateChapter 15.11B - Diels-alder Reactions Using Unsymmetrical ReagentsChapter 15.12C - Photochemical Induction Of CycloadditionsChapter 15.13C - Obtaining An Ultraviolet SpectrumChapter 15.13D - Interpreting Uv-visible SpectraChapter 15.14 - Colored Organic CompoundsChapter 16 - Aromatic CompoundsChapter 16.2 - The Structure And Properties Of BenzeneChapter 16.4 - The Molecular Orbital Picture Of CyclobutadieneChapter 16.6 - Huckel's RuleChapter 16.7 - Molecular Orbital Derivation Of Huckel's RuleChapter 16.8A - The Cyclopentadienyl IonsChapter 16.8C - The Cyclooctatetraene DianionChapter 16.9B - PyrroleChapter 16.9C - Pyrimidine And ImidazoleChapter 16.9D - Furan And ThiopheneChapter 16.10 - Polynuclear Aromatic HydrocarbonsChapter 16.12 - Fused Heterocyclic CompoundsChapter 16.13 - Nomenclature Of Benzene DerivativesChapter 16.15 - Spectroscopy Of Aromatic CompoundsChapter 17 - Reactions Of Aromatic CompoundsChapter 17.1 - Electrophilic Aromatic SubstitutionChapter 17.2 - Halogenation Of BenzeneChapter 17.3 - Nitration Of BenzeneChapter 17.4 - Sulfonation Of BenzeneChapter 17.6A - Alkyl GroupsChapter 17.6B - Substituents With Nonbonding ElectronsChapter 17.7 - Deactivating, Meta-directing SubstituentsChapter 17.8 - Halogen Substituents: Deactivating, But Ortho, Para-directingChapter 17.9 - Effects Of Multiple Substituents On Electrophilic Aromatic SubstitutionChapter 17.10 - The Friedel-crafts AlkylationChapter 17.11C - The Gatterman-koch Formylation: Synthesis Of BenzaldehydesChapter 17.12A - The Addition-elimination MechanismChapter 17.12B - The Benzyne Mechanism: Elimination-additionChapter 17.13A - Couplings Using Organocuprate ReagentsChapter 17.13B - The Heck ReactionChapter 17.13C - The Suzuki Reaction (suzuki Coupling)Chapter 17.14C - Birch ReductionChapter 17.15A - Permanganate OxidationChapter 17.15B - Side-chain HalogenationChapter 17.15C - Nucleophilic Substitution At The Benzylic PositionChapter 17.16A - Oxidation Of Phenols To QuinonesChapter 17.16B - Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution Of PhenolsChapter 18 - Ketones And AldehydesChapter 18.3 - Nomenclature Of Ketones And AldehydesChapter 18.5D - Mass Spectra Of Ketones And AldehydesChapter 18.5E - Ultraviolet Spectra Of Ketones And AldehydesChapter 18.7D - Ketones And Aldehydes From Hydration Of AlkynesChapter 18.8 - Synthesis Of Ketones From Carboxylic AcidsChapter 18.9 - Synthesis Of Ketones And Aldehydes From NitrilesChapter 18.10 - Synthesis Of Aldehydes And Ketones From Acid Chlorides And EstersChapter 18.11 - Reactions Of Ketones And Aldehydes: Introduction To Nucleophilic AdditionChapter 18.12 - Hydration Of Ketones And AldehydesChapter 18.13 - Formation Of CyanohydrinsChapter 18.14 - Formation Of IminesChapter 18.15 - Condensations With Hydroxylamine And HydrazinesChapter 18.16 - Formation Of AcetalsChapter 18.17 - Use Of Acetals As Protecting GroupsChapter 18.18 - The Wittig ReactionChapter 18.19 - Oxidation Of AldehydesChapter 18.20C - Deoxygenation Of Ketones And AldehydesChapter 19 - AminesChapter 19.2A - Common NamesChapter 19.2B - Iupac NamesChapter 19.3 - Structure Of AminesChapter 19.4 - Physical Properties Of AminesChapter 19.6 - Factors That Affect Amine BasicityChapter 19.8A - Infrared SpectroscopyChapter 19.8C - Carbon Nmr SpectroscopyChapter 19.8D - Mass SpectrometryChapter 19.10B - Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution Of PyridineChapter 19.10C - Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Of PyridineChapter 19.11 - Alkylation Of Amines By Alkyl HalidesChapter 19.12 - Acylation Of Amines By Acid ChloridesChapter 19.13 - Formation Of SulfonamidesChapter 19.14 - Amines Are Leaving Groups: The Hofmann EliminationChapter 19.15 - Oxidation Of Amines; The Cope EliminationChapter 19.16 - Reactions Of Amines With Nitrous AcidChapter 19.17 - Reactions Of Arenediazonium SaltsChapter 19.18 - Synthesis Of Amines By Reductive AminationChapter 19.19 - Synthesis Of Amines By Acylation-reductionChapter 19.20A - Direct Alkylation And Gabriel SynthesisChapter 19.20B - Reduction Of Azides And NitrilesChapter 19.20C - Reduction Of Nitro CompoundsChapter 20 - Carboxylic AcidsChapter 20.2C - Nomenclature Of Dicarboxylic AcidsChapter 20.4B - Substituent Effects On AcidityChapter 20.5 - Salts Of Carboxylic AcidsChapter 20.7A - Infrared SpectroscopyChapter 20.7B - Nmr SpectroscopyChapter 20.7D - Mass SpectrometryChapter 20.10 - Condensation Of Acids And Alcohols: The Fischer EsterificationChapter 20.12 - Condensation Of Acids With Amines: Direct Synthesis Of AmidesChapter 20.13 - Reduction Of Carboxylic AcidsChapter 20.14 - Alkylation Of Carboxylic Acids To Form KetonesChapter 20.15 - Synthesis And Use Of Acid ChloridesChapter 21 - Carboxylic Acid DerivativesChapter 21.2F - Nomenclature Of Multifunctional CompoundsChapter 21.4A - Infrared SpectroscopyChapter 21.5C - Leaving Groups In Nucleophilic Acyl SubstitutionsChapter 21.6 - TransesterificationChapter 21.7B - Hydrolysis Of EstersChapter 21.7C - Hydrolysis Of AmidesChapter 21.7D - Hydrolysis Of NitrilesChapter 21.8A - Reduction To AlcoholsChapter 21.8C - Reduction To AminesChapter 21.9 - Reactions Of Acid Derivatives With Organometallic ReagentsChapter 21.10 - Summary Of The Chemistry Of Acid ChloridesChapter 21.11 - Summary Of The Chemistry Of AnhydridesChapter 21.12 - Summary Of The Chemistry Of EstersChapter 21.13 - Summary Of The Chemistry Of AmidesChapter 21.14 - Summary Of The Chemistry Of NitrilesChapter 21.16 - Esters And Amides Of Carbonic AcidChapter 22 - Condensations And Alpha Substitutions Of Carbonyl CompoundsChapter 22.2A - Keto-enol TautomerismChapter 22.4 - Formation And Alkylation Of EnaminesChapter 22.5A - Base-promoted Α-halogenationChapter 22.5B - The Haloform ReactionChapter 22.5C - Acid-catalyzed Alpha HalogenationChapter 22.6 - Alpha Bromination Of Acids: The Hvz ReactionChapter 22.7A - Base-catalyzed Aldon CondensationsChapter 22.7B - Acid-catalyzed Aldol CondensationsChapter 22.8 - Dehydration Of Aldol ProductsChapter 22.9 - Crossed Aldol CondensationsChapter 22.10 - Aldol CyclizationsChapter 22.11 - Planning Syntheses Using Aldol CondensationsChapter 22.12 - The Claisen Ester CondensationChapter 22.13 - The Dieckmann Condesnation: A Claisen CyclizationChapter 22.14 - Crossed Claisen CondensationChapter 22.15 - Syntheses Using Β-dicarbonyl CompoundsChapter 22.16 - The Malonic Ester SynthesisChapter 22.17 - The Acetoacetic Ester SynthesisChapter 22.18 - Conjugate Additions: The Michael ReactionChapter 22.19 - The Robinson AnnulationChapter 23 - Carbohydrates And Nucleic AcidsChapter 23.2 - Classification Of CarbohydratesChapter 23.3A - Classification Of MonosaccharidesChapter 23.3B - The D And L Configuration Of SugarsChapter 23.3C - EpimersChapter 23.4 - Cyclic Structures Of MonosaccharidesChapter 23.5 - Anomers Of Monosaccharides; MutarotationChapter 23.6 - Reactions Of Monosaccharides: ReductionChapter 23.7 - Oxidation Of Monosaccharides; Reducing SugarsChapter 23.8 - Nonreducing Sugars: Formation Of GlycosidesChapter 23.9 - Ether And Ester FormationChapter 23.10 - Chain Shortening: The Ruff DegradationChapter 23.11 - Chain Lengthening: The Kiliani-fischer SynthesisChapter 23.12A - The 1,4' Linkage: Cellobiose, Maltose, And LactoseChapter 23.12B - The 1,6' Linkage: GentiobioseChapter 23.12C - Linkage Of Two Anomeric Carbons: SucroseChapter 23.13A - CelluloseChapter 23.15 - Ribonucleosides And RibonucleotidesChapter 23.16C - Base PairingChapter 24 - Amino Acids, Peptides, And ProteinsChapter 24.2A - The Standard Amino Acids Of ProteinsChapter 24.2B - Essential Amino AcidsChapter 24.4 - Isoelectric Points And ElectrophoresisChapter 24.5A - Reductive AminationChapter 24.5B - Amination Of An Α-halo AcidChapter 24.5C - The Strecker SynthesisChapter 24.6 - Resolution Of Amino AcidsChapter 24.7A - Esterification Of The Carboxyl GroupChapter 24.7B - Acylation Of The Amino Group: Formation Of AmidesChapter 24.7C - Reaction With NinhydrinChapter 24.8B - Peptide NomenclatureChapter 24.9C - Sequencing From The N-terminus: The Edman DegradationChapter 24.9E - Breaking The Peptide Into Shorter Chains: Partial HydrolysisChapter 24.10A - The Individual ReactionsChapter 24.10B - An Example Of Solid-phase Peptide SynthesisChapter 25 - LipidsChapter 25.3 - TriglyceridesChapter 25.3A - Hydrogenation Of Triglycerides; Trans FatsChapter 25.3B - Transesterification Of Fats And Oils To BiodieselChapter 25.4 - Saponification Of Fats And Oils: Soaps And DetergentsChapter 25.5 - PhospholipidsChapter 25.6 - SteroidsChapter 25.8A - Characteristics And Nomenclature Of TerpenesChapter 25.8B - Classification Of TerpenesChapter 26 - Synthetic PolymersChapter 26.2A - Free-radical PolymerizationChapter 26.2B - Cationic PolymerizationChapter 26.2C - Anionic PolymerizationChapter 26.3 - Stereochemistry Of PolymersChapter 26.5 - Natural And Synthetic RubbersChapter 26.6 - Copolymers Of Two Or More MonomersChapter 26.7A - Polyamides: NylonChapter 26.7B - PolyestersChapter 26.7C - PolycarbonatesChapter 26.7D - Polyurethanes

Book Details

A Student-Centered Approach to Learning and Studying Organic Chemistry. Wade & Simek's Ninth edition of Organic Chemistry presents key principles of organic chemistry in the context of fundamental reasoning and problem solving. Authored to complement how students use a textbook today, new Problem Solving Strategies, Partially Solved Problems, Visual Reaction Guides and Reaction Starbursts encourage students to use the text before class as a primary introduction to organic chemistry as well as a comprehensive study tool for working problems and/or preparing for exams. With unparalleled and highly refined pedagogy, this Ninth edition gives students a contemporary overview of organic principles and the tools for organizing and understanding reaction mechanisms and synthetic organic chemistry.

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The structure of the alcohol is given below. Figure 1 In the given structure of alcohol, the longest...The given reaction occurs between (R)-butan-2-ol and TsCl in pyridine. Tosyl chloride in pyridine as...The structure of the given molecule is, Figure 2 The possibilities of the IR stretching frequencies...The molecular formula of the compound (C9H11Br). The double bond equivalent is calculated by the...The given compound is ethyl isopropyl ether. The root name isopropyl signifies three carbon atoms in...The structure of given diene is shown in figure 1. Figure 1 It is conferred from the above structure...The name of the given compound is o−nitroanisole. It means that nitro group is present at the ortho...The major product that is formed by reaction of benzene with tert−butyl bromide in the presence of...The given derivative is 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone of benzaldehyde. The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine...The classification of the nitrogen containing functional groups is as follows, a. The given compound...The chemical structure of the given compound is shown in figure 1. Figure 1 The structure comprises...The given compound is phenyl formate. The molecular formula of phenyl formate is C7O2H6. The...In a molecule, different types of protons are present. However, when acting as acids, only the most...The Fisher projection of the open chain of glucose is shown below. Glucose is an aldose because it a...The structures of the major forms of phenylalanine at pH values of 1, 5.5, and 11 are shown in...Saturated fats are those in which the bond between carbon and hydrogen molecules is saturated. They...Polyisobutylene formed from the cationic polymerization of isobutylene which proceeds through the...

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Organic Chemistry and CW+ GradeTracker Access Card Package
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