Physics (5th Edition) - 5th Edition - by James S. Walker - ISBN 9780321976444
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Physics (5th Edition)
5th Edition
James S. Walker
Publisher: PEARSON
ISBN: 9780321976444

Solutions for Physics (5th Edition)

Browse All Chapters of This Textbook

Chapter 2.2 - Average Speed And VelocityChapter 2.3 - Instantaneous VelocityChapter 2.4 - AccelerationChapter 2.5 - Motion With Constant AccelerationChapter 2.6 - Applications Of The Equations Of MotionChapter 2.7 - Freely Falling ObjectsChapter 3 - Vectors In PhysicsChapter 3.1 - Scalars Versus VectorsChapter 3.2 - The Components Of A VectorChapter 3.3 - Adding And Subtracting VectorsChapter 3.4 - Unit VectorsChapter 3.5 - Position, Displacement, Velocity, And Acceleration VectorsChapter 3.6 - Relative MotionChapter 4 - Two-Dimensional KinematicsChapter 4.1 - Motion In Two DimensionsChapter 4.2 - Projectile Motion: Basic EquationsChapter 4.3 - Zero Launch AngleChapter 4.4 - General Launch AngleChapter 4.5 - Projectile Motion: Key CharacteristicsChapter 5 - Newton’s Laws Of MotionChapter 5.1 - Force And MassChapter 5.2 - Newton’s First Law Of MotionChapter 5.3 - Newton’s Second Law Of MotionChapter 5.4 - Newton’s Third Law Of MotionChapter 5.5 - The Vector Nature Of Forces: Forces In Two DimensionsChapter 5.6 - WeightChapter 5.7 - Normal ForcesChapter 6 - Applications Of Newton’s LawsChapter 6.1 - Frictional ForcesChapter 6.2 - Strings And SpringsChapter 6.3 - Translational EquilibriumChapter 6.4 - Connected ObjectsChapter 6.5 - Circular MotionChapter 7 - Work And Kinetic EnergyChapter 7.1 - Work Done By A Constant ForceChapter 7.2 - Kinetic Energy And The Work–Energy TheoremChapter 7.3 - Work Done By A Variable ForceChapter 7.4 - PowerChapter 8 - Potential Energy And Conservation Of EnergyChapter 8.1 - Conservative And Nonconservative ForcesChapter 8.2 - Potential Energy And The Work Done By Conservative ForcesChapter 8.3 - Conservation Of Mechanical EnergyChapter 8.4 - Work Done By Nonconservative ForcesChapter 8.5 - Potential Energy Curves And EquipotentialsChapter 9 - Linear Momentum And CollisionsChapter 9.1 - Linear MomentumChapter 9.2 - Momentum And Newton’s Second LawChapter 9.3 - ImpulseChapter 9.4 - Conservation Of Linear MomentumChapter 9.5 - Inelastic CollisionsChapter 9.6 - Elastic CollisionsChapter 9.7 - Center Of MassChapter 9.8 - Systems With Changing Mass: Rocket PropulsionChapter 10 - Rotational Kinematics And EnergyChapter 10.1 - Angular Position, Velocity, And AccelerationChapter 10.2 - Rotational KinematicsChapter 10.3 - Connections Between Linear And Rotational QuantitiesChapter 10.4 - Rolling MotionChapter 10.5 - Rotational Kinetic Energy And The Moment Of InertiaChapter 10.6 - Conservation Of EnergyChapter 11 - Rotational Dynamics And Static EquilibriumChapter 11.1 - TorqueChapter 11.2 - Torque And Angular AccelerationChapter 11.3 - Zero Torque And Static EquilibriumChapter 11.4 - Center Of Mass And BalanceChapter 11.5 - Dynamic Applications Of TorqueChapter 11.6 - Angular MomentumChapter 11.7 - Conservation Of Angular MomentumChapter 11.8 - Rotational Work And PowerChapter 11.9 - The Vector Nature Of Rotational MotionChapter 12 - GravityChapter 12.1 - Newton’s Law Of Universal GravitationChapter 12.2 - Gravitational Attraction Of Spherical BodiesChapter 12.3 - Kepler’s Laws Of Orbital MotionChapter 12.4 - Gravitational Potential EnergyChapter 12.5 - Energy ConservationChapter 12.6 - TidesChapter 13 - Oscillations About EquilibriumChapter 13.1 - Periodic MotionChapter 13.2 - Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 13.3 - Connections Between Uniform Circular Motion And Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 13.4 - The Period Of A Mass On A SpringChapter 13.5 - Energy Conservation In Oscillatory MotionChapter 13.6 - The PendulumChapter 13.7 - Damped OscillationsChapter 13.8 - Driven Oscillations And ResonanceChapter 14 - Waves And SoundChapter 14.1 - Types Of WavesChapter 14.2 - Waves On A StringChapter 14.3 - Harmonic Wave FunctionsChapter 14.4 - Sound WavesChapter 14.5 - Sound IntensityChapter 14.6 - The Doppler EffectChapter 14.7 - Superposition And InterferenceChapter 14.8 - Standing WavesChapter 14.9 - BeatsChapter 15 - FluidsChapter 15.1 - DensityChapter 15.2 - PressureChapter 15.3 - Static Equilibrium In Fluids: Pressure And DepthChapter 15.4 - Archimedes’ Principle And BuoyancyChapter 15.5 - Applications Of Archimedes’ PrincipleChapter 15.6 - Fluid Flow And ContinuityChapter 15.7 - Bernoulli’s EquationChapter 15.8 - Applications Of Bernoulli’s EquationChapter 15.9 - Viscosity And Surface TensionChapter 16 - Temperature And HeatChapter 16.1 - Temperature And The Zeroth Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 16.2 - Temperature ScalesChapter 16.3 - Thermal ExpansionChapter 16.4 - Heat And Mechanical WorkChapter 16.5 - Specific HeatsChapter 16.6 - Conduction, Convection, And RadiationChapter 17 - Phases And Phase ChangesChapter 17.1 - Ideal GasesChapter 17.2 - The Kinetic Theory Of GasesChapter 17.3 - Solids And Elastic DeformationChapter 17.4 - Phase Equilibrium And EvaporationChapter 17.5 - Latent HeatsChapter 17.6 - Phase Changes And Energy ConservationChapter 18 - The Laws Of ThermodynamicsChapter 18.1 - The Zeroth Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 18.2 - The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 18.3 - Thermal ProcessesChapter 18.4 - Specific Heats For An Ideal Gas: Constant Pressure, Constant VolumeChapter 18.5 - The Second Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 18.6 - Heat Engines And The Carnot CycleChapter 18.7 - Refrigerators, Air Conditioners, And Heat PumpsChapter 18.8 - EntropyChapter 18.9 - Order, Disorder, And EntropyChapter 18.10 - The Third Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 19 - Electric Charges, Forces, And FieldsChapter 19.1 - Electric ChargeChapter 19.2 - Insulators And ConductorsChapter 19.3 - Coulomb’s LawChapter 19.4 - The Electric FieldChapter 19.5 - Electric Field LinesChapter 19.6 - Shielding And Charging By InductionChapter 19.7 - Electric Flux And Gauss’s LawChapter 20 - Electric Potential And Electric Potential EnergyChapter 20.1 - Electric Potential Energy And The Electric PotentialChapter 20.2 - Energy ConservationChapter 20.3 - The Electric Potential Of Point ChargesChapter 20.4 - Equipotential Surfaces And The Electric FieldChapter 20.5 - Capacitors And DielectricsChapter 20.6 - Electrical Energy StorageChapter 21 - Electric Current And Direct-Current CircuitsChapter 21.1 - Electric CurrentChapter 21.2 - Resistance And Ohm’s LawChapter 21.3 - Energy And Power In Electric CircuitsChapter 21.4 - Resistors In Series And ParallelChapter 21.5 - Kirchhoff’s RulesChapter 21.6 - Circuits Containing CapacitorsChapter 21.7 - Rc CircuitsChapter 22 - MagnetismChapter 22.1 - The Magnetic FieldChapter 22.2 - The Magnetic Force On Moving ChargesChapter 22.3 - The Motion Of Charged Particles In A Magnetic FieldChapter 22.4 - The Magnetic Force Exerted On A Current-Carrying WireChapter 22.5 - Loops Of Current And Magnetic TorqueChapter 22.6 - Electric Currents, Magnetic Fields, And Ampère’s LawChapter 22.7 - Current Loops And SolenoidsChapter 23 - Magnetic Flux And Faraday’s Law Of InductionChapter 23.1 - Induced Electromotive ForceChapter 23.2 - Magnetic FluxChapter 23.3 - Faraday’s Law Of InductionChapter 23.4 - Lenz’s LawChapter 23.5 - Mechanical Work And Electrical EnergyChapter 23.6 - Generators And MotorsChapter 23.7 - InductanceChapter 23.8 - Rl CircuitsChapter 23.9 - Energy Stored In A Magnetic FieldChapter 23.10 - TransformersChapter 24 - Alternating-Current CircuitsChapter 24.1 - Alternating Voltages And CurrentsChapter 24.2 - Capacitors In Ac CircuitsChapter 24.3 - Rc CircuitsChapter 24.4 - Inductors In Ac CircuitsChapter 24.5 - Rlc CircuitsChapter 24.6 - Resonance In Electric CircuitsChapter 25 - Electromagnetic WaveChapter 25.1 - The Production Of Electromagnetic WavesChapter 25.2 - The Propagation Of Electromagnetic WavesChapter 25.3 - The Electromagnetic SpectrumChapter 25.4 - Energy And Momentum In Electromagnetic WavesChapter 25.5 - PolarizationChapter 26 - Geometrical OpticsChapter 26.1 - The Reflection Of LightChapter 26.2 - Forming Images With A Plane MirrorChapter 26.3 - Spherical MirrorsChapter 26.4 - Ray Tracing And The Mirror EquationChapter 26.5 - The Refraction Of LightChapter 26.6 - Ray Tracing For LensesChapter 26.7 - The Thin-Lens EquationChapter 26.8 - Dispersion And The RainbowChapter 27 - Optical InstrumentsChapter 27.1 - The Human Eye And The CameraChapter 27.2 - Lenses In Combination And Corrective OpticsChapter 27.3 - The Magnifying GlassChapter 27.4 - The Compound MicroscopeChapter 27.5 - TelescopesChapter 27.6 - Lens AberrationsChapter 28 - Physical Optics: Interference And DiffractionChapter 28.1 - Superposition And InterferenceChapter 28.2 - Young’s Two-slit ExperimentChapter 28.3 - Interference In Reflected WavesChapter 28.4 - DiffractionChapter 28.5 - ResolutionChapter 28.6 - Diffraction GratingsChapter 29 - RelativityChapter 29.1 - The Postulates Of Special RelativityChapter 29.2 - The Relativity Of Time And Time DilationChapter 29.3 - The Relativity Of Length And Length ContractionChapter 29.4 - The Relativistic Addition Of VelocitiesChapter 29.5 - Relativistic MomentumChapter 29.6 - Relativistic Energy And E=mc2Chapter 29.7 - The Relativistic UniverseChapter 29.8 - General RelativityChapter 30 - Quantum PhysicsChapter 30.1 - Blackbody Radiation And Planck’s Hypothesis Of Quantized EnergyChapter 30.2 - Photons And The Photoelectric EffectChapter 30.3 - The Mass And Momentum Of A PhotonChapter 30.4 - Photon Scattering And The Compton EffectChapter 30.5 - The De Broglie Hypothesis And Wave–Particle DualityChapter 30.6 - The Heisenberg Uncertainty PrincipleChapter 30.7 - Quantum TunnelingChapter 31 - Atomic PhysicsChapter 31.1 - Early Models Of The AtomChapter 31.2 - The Spectrum Of Atomic HydrogenChapter 31.3 - Bohr’s Model Of The Hydrogen AtomChapter 31.4 - De Broglie Waves And The Bohr ModelChapter 31.5 - The Quantum Mechanical Hydrogen AtomChapter 31.6 - Multielectron Atoms And The Periodic TableChapter 31.7 - Atomic RadiationChapter 32 - Nuclear Physics And Nuclear RadiationChapter 32.1 - The Constituents And Structure Of NucleiChapter 32.2 - RadioactivityChapter 32.3 - Half-Life And Radioactive DatingChapter 32.4 - Nuclear Binding EnergyChapter 32.5 - Nuclear FissionChapter 32.6 - Nuclear FusionChapter 32.7 - Practical Applications Of Nuclear PhysicsChapter 32.8 - Elementary ParticlesChapter 32.9 - Unified Forces And Cosmology

Book Details

James Walker's Physics provides students with a solid conceptual understanding of physics that can be expressed quantitatively and applied to the world around them. Instructors and students praise Walker's Physics for its friendly voice, the author's talent for making complex concepts understandable, an inviting art program, and the range of excellent homework problems and example-types that provide guidance with problem solving. The Fifth Edition includes new "just-in-time" learning aids such as "Big Ideas" to quickly orient students to the overarching principles of each chapter, new Real-World Physics and Biological applications, and a wealth of problem-solving support features to coach students through the process of applying logic and reasoning to problem solving.  

Sample Solutions for this Textbook

We offer sample solutions for Physics (5th Edition) homework problems. See examples below:

A rigid object rotates about a fixed axis. Do all points on the object have the same angular speed?...Two forces produce the same torque. Does it follow that they have the same magnitude? Explain.It is often said that astronauts in orbit experience weightlessness because they are beyond the pull...A basketball player dribbles a ball with a steady period of T seconds. Is the motion of the ball...A long nail has been driven halfway into the side of a barn. How should you hit the nail with a...Suppose you drink a liquid through a straw. Explain why the liquid moves upward, against gravity,...Explanation: If there is no temperature difference between two physically contacted substances or...How is the air pressure in a tightly sealed house affected by operating the furnace? Explain.Explanation: The formula to calculate the amount of heat is, Q=ΔU+W Here, ΔU is the change in the...The fact that the electron has a negative charge and the proton has a positive charge is due to a...In one region of space the electric potential has a positive constant value. In another region of...Your body is composed of electric charges. Does it follow, then, that you produce an electric...Two charged particles move at right angles to a magnetic field and deflect in opposite directions....Explain the difference between a magnetic field and a magnetic flux.Why is the current in an ac circuit not always in phase with its voltage?Explain why the invisible man would be unable to see.Two plane mirrors meet at right angles at the origin, as indicated in Figure 26-54. Suppose an...Explanation: The human eye feel relaxed when the viewing object is at least 6 m away but when we...Explanation: When two light waves interfere destructively, then the net energy of the resultant wave...Some distant galaxies are moving away from us at speeds greater than 0.5c. What is the speed of the...Explanation: Ultraviolet Catastrophe is a classical prediction and is also known as Rayleigh–Jeans...Explanation: Rutherford struck alpha particles with a thin sheet of golf foil in order to find out...Explanation: Nucleus A and nucleus B have different number of protons and neutrons. The formula to...

More Editions of This Book

Corresponding editions of this textbook are also available below:

Physics, Books a la Carte Plus Mastering Physics with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package (5th Edition)
5th Edition
ISBN: 9780134032610
Modified Mastering Physics with Pearson eText -- Access Card -- for Physics (18-Weeks)
5th Edition
ISBN: 9780136781356
Physics (5th Edition)
5th Edition
ISBN: 9780134051802
Physics, Books a la Carte Edition (5th Edition)
5th Edition
ISBN: 9780134020853
EBK PHYSICS
5th Edition
ISBN: 9780134051796
EP PHYSICS -MOD.MASTERING (18W)
5th Edition
ISBN: 9780136782490
Physics
2nd Edition
ISBN: 9780131194946
Physics, Vol. Ii
1st Edition
ISBN: 9780130270542
Physics: Ap Edition
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9780131960671
Physics
4th Edition
ISBN: 9780321611116
Physics Technology Update + MasteringPhysics With eBook Access Card
4th Edition
ISBN: 9780321903037

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