Physics - 5th Edition - by GIAMBATTISTA - ISBN 9781260486919
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Physics
5th Edition
GIAMBATTISTA
Publisher: MCG
ISBN: 9781260486919

Solutions for Physics

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Chapter 2.3 - Acceleration: Rate Of Change Of VelocityChapter 2.4 - Visualizing Motion Along A Line With Constant AccelerationChapter 2.5 - Kinematic Equations For Motion Along A Line With Constant AccelerationChapter 2.6 - Free FallChapter 3 - Motion In A PlaneChapter 3.1 - Graphical Addition And Subtraction Of VectorsChapter 3.2 - Vector Addition And Subtraction Using ComponentsChapter 3.3 - VelocityChapter 3.4 - AccelerationChapter 3.5 - Motion In A Plane With Constant AccelerationChapter 3.6 - Velocity Is Relative; Reference FramesChapter 4 - Force And Newton's Laws Of MotionChapter 4.1 - Interaction And ForcesChapter 4.2 - Inertia And Equilibrium: Newton's First Law Of MotionChapter 4.4 - Interaction Pairs: Newton's Third Law Of MotionChapter 4.5 - Gravitational ForcesChapter 4.6 - Contact ForcesChapter 4.7 - TensionChapter 4.8 - Applying Newton's LawsChapter 4.10 - Apparent WeightChapter 5 - Circular MotionChapter 5.1 - Description Of Uniform Circular MotionChapter 5.2 - Radial AccelerationChapter 5.3 - Unbanked And Banked CurvesChapter 5.4 - Circular Orbit Of Satellite And PlanetsChapter 5.5 - Nonuniform Circular MotionChapter 5.6 - Angular AccelerationChapter 5.7 - Apparent Weight And Artificial GravityChapter 6 - Conservation Of EnergyChapter 6.2 - Work Done By A Constant ForceChapter 6.3 - Kinetic EnergyChapter 6.4 - Gravitational Potential Energy - 1Chapter 6.5 - Gravitational Potential Energy -2Chapter 6.6 - Work Done By A Variable ForcesChapter 6.7 - Elastic Potential EnergyChapter 6.8 - PowerChapter 7 - Linear MomentumChapter 7.2 - MomentumChapter 7.3 - The Impulse-momentum TheoremChapter 7.4 - Conservation Of MomentumChapter 7.5 - Center Of MassChapter 7.6 - Motion Of The Center Of The MassChapter 7.7 - Collisions In One DimensionsChapter 7.8 - Collisions In Two DimensionsChapter 8 - Torque And Angular MomentumChapter 8.1 - Rotational Kinetic Energy And Rotational InertiaChapter 8.2 - TorqueChapter 8.3 - Calculating Work Done From The TorqueChapter 8.4 - Rotational EquilibriumChapter 8.5 - Application: Equilibrium In The Human BodyChapter 8.6 - Rotational Form Of Newton's Second LawChapter 8.7 - The Motion Of Rolling ObjectsChapter 8.8 - Angular MomentumChapter 9 - FluidsChapter 9.2 - PressureChapter 9.3 - Pascal's PrincipleChapter 9.4 - The Effect Of Gravity On Fluid PressureChapter 9.5 - Measuring PressureChapter 9.6 - The Buoyant ForceChapter 9.7 - Fluid FlowChapter 9.8 - Bernoullis EquationChapter 9.9 - ViscosityChapter 9.10 - Viscous DragChapter 9.11 - Surface TensionChapter 10 - Elasticity And OscillationsChapter 10.2 - Hook's Law Of Tensile And Compressive ForcesChapter 10.3 - Beyond Hook's LawChapter 10.4 - Shear And Volume DeformationsChapter 10.5 - Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 10.6 - The Period And Frequency Of ShmChapter 10.7 - Graphical Analysis Of ShmChapter 10.8 - The PendulumChapter 11 - WavesChapter 11.1 - Waves And Energy TransportChapter 11.2 - Transverse And Longitudinal WavesChapter 11.3 - Speed Of Transverse Waves On A StringChapter 11.4 - Periodic WavesChapter 11.5 - Mathematical Description Of A WaveChapter 11.6 - Graphing WavesChapter 11.7 - Principle Of SuperpositionChapter 11.8 - Reflection And RefractionChapter 11.9 - Interference And DiffractionChapter 11.10 - Standing WavesChapter 12 - SoundChapter 12.2 - The Speed Of Sound WavesChapter 12.3 - Amplitude And Intensity Of Sound WavesChapter 12.4 - Standing Sound WavesChapter 12.7 - BeatsChapter 12.8 - The Doppler EffectChapter 13 - Temperature And Ideal GasChapter 13.2 - Temperature ScalesChapter 13.3 - Thermal Expansion Of Solids And LiquidsChapter 13.4 - Molecular Picture Of A GasChapter 13.5 - Absolute Temperature And The Ideal Gas LawChapter 13.6 - Kinetic Theory Of The Ideal GasChapter 13.7 - Temperature And Reaction RatesChapter 13.8 - DiffusionChapter 14 - HeatChapter 14.1 - Internal EnergyChapter 14.2 - HeatChapter 14.3 - Heat Capacity And Specific HeatChapter 14.4 - Specific Heat Of Ideal GasesChapter 14.5 - Phase TransitionsChapter 14.6 - Thermal ConductionChapter 14.8 - Thermal RadiationChapter 15 - ThermodynamicsChapter 15.1 - The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 15.2 - Thermodynamic ProcessesChapter 15.3 - Thermodynamic Process For An Ideal GasChapter 15.4 - Reversible And Irreversible ProcessChapter 15.5 - Heat EnginesChapter 15.6 - Refrigerators And Heat PumpsChapter 15.7 - Reversible Engines And Heat PumpsChapter 15.8 - EntropyChapter 16 - Electric Forces And FieldsChapter 16.1 - Electric ChargeChapter 16.2 - Electric Conductors And InsulatorsChapter 16.3 - Coulomb's LawChapter 16.4 - The Electric FieldChapter 16.5 - Motion Of A Point Charge In A Uniform Electric FieldChapter 16.6 - Conductors In Electrostatic EquilibriumChapter 16.7 - Gauss's Law For Electric FieldsChapter 17 - Electric PotentialChapter 17.1 - Electric Potential EnergyChapter 17.2 - Electric PotentialChapter 17.3 - The Relationship Between Electric Field And PotentialChapter 17.4 - Conservation Of Energy For Moving ChargesChapter 17.5 - CapacitorsChapter 17.6 - DielectricsChapter 17.7 - Energy Stored In A CapacitorChapter 18 - Electric Current And CircuitsChapter 18.1 - Electric CurrentChapter 18.3 - Microscopic View Of Current In A Metal: The Free-electron ModelChapter 18.4 - Resistance And ResistivityChapter 18.6 - Series And Parallel CircuitsChapter 18.7 - Circuit Analysis Using Kirchhoff's RulesChapter 18.8 - Power And Energy In CircuitsChapter 18.9 - Measuring Current And VoltageChapter 19 - Magnetic Forces And FieldsChapter 19.2 - Magnetic Force On A Point ChargeChapter 19.3 - Charged Particle Moving Perpendicularly To A Uniform Magnetic FieldChapter 19.4 - Motion Of A Charged Particle In A Uniform Magnetic Field: GeneralChapter 19.5 - A Charged Particle In Crossed E And B FieldsChapter 19.6 - Magnetic Force On A Current-carrying WireChapter 19.7 - Torque On A Current LoopChapter 19.8 - Magnetic Field Due To An Electric CurrentChapter 19.9 - Ampere's LawChapter 20 - Electromagnetic InductionChapter 20.1 - Motional EmfChapter 20.2 - Electric GeneratorsChapter 20.3 - Faraday's LawChapter 20.4 - Lenz's LawChapter 20.6 - TransformersChapter 20.7 - Eddy CurrentsChapter 20.9 - InductanceChapter 20.10 - Lr CircuitsChapter 21 - Alternating CurrentChapter 21.1 - Sinusoidal Currents And Voltages: Resistors In Ac CircuitsChapter 21.3 - Capacitors In Ac CircuitsChapter 21.4 - Inductors In Ac CircuitsChapter 21.5 - Rlc Series CircuitsChapter 21.6 - Resonance In An Rlc CircuitChapter 22 - Electromagnetic WavesChapter 22.2 - AntennasChapter 22.4 - Speed Of Em Waves In Vacuum And In MatterChapter 22.5 - Characteristics Of Traveling Electromagnetic Waves In VacuumChapter 22.6 - Energy Transport By Em WavesChapter 22.7 - PolarizationChapter 22.8 - The Doppler Effect For Em WavesChapter 23 - Reflection And Refraction Of LightChapter 23.1 - Wavefronts, Rays, And Hygens's PrincipleChapter 23.3 - The Refraction Of Light: Snell's LawChapter 23.4 - The Total Internal ReflectionChapter 23.5 - Polarization By ReflectionChapter 23.6 - The Formation Of Images Through Reflection Or RefractionChapter 23.7 - Plane MirrorsChapter 23.8 - Spherical MirrorsChapter 23.9 - Thin LensesChapter 24 - Optical InstrumentsChapter 24.1 - Lenses In CombinationChapter 24.2 - CamerasChapter 24.3 - The EyeChapter 24.4 - Angular Magnification And The Simple MagnifierChapter 24.5 - Compound MicroscopesChapter 24.6 - TelescopesChapter 25 - Interference And DiffractionChapter 25.1 - Constructive And Destructive InterferenceChapter 25.2 - The Michelson InterferometerChapter 25.3 - Thin FilmsChapter 25.4 - Young's Double-slit ExperimentChapter 25.5 - GratingsChapter 25.6 - Diffraction And Huygens's PrincipleChapter 25.7 - Diffraction By A Single SlitChapter 25.8 - Diffraction And Resolution Of Optical InstrumentsChapter 26 - RelativityChapter 26.1 - Postulates Of RelativityChapter 26.3 - Time DilationChapter 26.4 - Length ContractionChapter 26.5 - Velocities In Different Reference FramesChapter 26.6 - Relativistic MomentumChapter 26.7 - Mass And EnergyChapter 26.8 - Relativistic Kinetic EnergyChapter 27 - Early Quantum Physics And The PhotonChapter 27.2 - Blackbody RadiationChapter 27.3 - The Photoelectric EffectChapter 27.4 - X-ray ProductionChapter 27.5 - Compton ScatteringChapter 27.7 - The Bohr Model Of The Hydrogen Atom; Atomic Energy LevelsChapter 27.8 - Pair Annihilation And Pair ProductionChapter 28 - Quantum PhysicsChapter 28.2 - Matter WavesChapter 28.4 - The Uncertainty PrincipleChapter 28.6 - The Hydrogen Atom: Wave Functions And Quantum NumbersChapter 28.7 - The Exclusion Principle: Electron Configurations For Atoms Other Than Hydrogen AtomChapter 28.9 - LasersChapter 28.10 - TunnelingChapter 29 - Nuclear PhysicsChapter 29.1 - Nuclear StructureChapter 29.2 - Binding EnergyChapter 29.3 - RadioactivityChapter 29.4 - Radioactive Decay Rates And Half-livesChapter 29.5 - Biological Effects Of RadiationChapter 29.6 - Induced Nuclear ReactionsChapter 29.7 - FissionChapter 29.8 - FusionChapter 30 - Particle PhysicsChapter 30.1 - Fundamental ParticlesChapter 30.2 - Fundamental Interactions

Sample Solutions for this Textbook

We offer sample solutions for Physics homework problems. See examples below:

The Young’s modulus of the any material is nothing but the ratio of linear stress applied to the...Generally waves are classified into two, one is transverse wave and another is longitudinal waves....Pitch is the perception of frequency. A high frequency sound corresponds to a high pitch whereas a...The zeroth law of thermodynamics define that “if two thermodynamic systems are in thermal...The heat flow direction does not depend on the position of the objects. Gravity have no effect on...The heat pump with coefficient of performance 1 will not really be a heat pump. The main example for...Gravitational force is always attractive but the electrical force can be either attractive or...When we move two opposite charges close together, their initial and final kinetic energies will be...The electric filed is essential for the flow of current in the conductors and keep the current...Electric force is the product of electric field and the charge. This makes the electric field to be...With the rotation of the loop, the associated magnetic flux increases. The flux approaches its...As the alternating current flows through a circuit containing an uncharged capacitor, charge begins...In electric dipole antenna, better signal reception will take place if it is aligned with electric...When the radiation is incident on a surface and the radiation is reflecting with an angle of...The real image of the real object is needed for the camera and the slide projector. This is only...The coherent waves will have a definite fixed phase relationship between them. If the frequency of...The observation of relativity is obvious for objects with speed comparable to the speed of light. In...Photoelectric effect is the phenomenon in which the electrons are ejected from the surface of a...The angle of diffraction is same in both the electron diffraction and the x-ray diffraction...Henri Becquerel and other scientists determine there are three kinds of radiation and named them as...The atom is made any of six quarks or antiquarks and six leptons or antileptons. The six quarks are...

More Editions of This Book

Corresponding editions of this textbook are also available below:

Physics
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9780073512150
Physics
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9781259233616
PHYSICS
5th Edition
ISBN: 2818440038631
Physics
5th Edition
ISBN: 9781260487008
Physics
2nd Edition
ISBN: 9780077339685

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