Prescott's Microbiology - 11th Edition - by WILLEY, Sandman, Wood - ISBN 9781260211887
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Prescott's Microbiology
11th Edition
WILLEY, Sandman, Wood
Publisher: McGraw Hill
ISBN: 9781260211887

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Chapter 2.5 - Scanning Probe Microscopy Can Visualize Molecules And AtomsChapter 3 - Bacterial Cell StructureChapter 3.2 - Bacteria Are Diverse But Share Some Common FeaturesChapter 3.3 - Bacterial Plasma Membranes Control What Enters And Leaves The CellChapter 3.4 - There Are Two Main Types Of Bacterial Cell WallsChapter 3.5 - The Cell Envelope Often Includes Layers Outside The Cell WallChapter 3.6 - The Bacterial Cytoplasm Is More Complex Than Once ThoughtChapter 3.7 - Many Bacteria Have External Structures Used For Attachment And MotilityChapter 3.8 - Bacteria Move In Response To Environmental ConditionsChapter 3.9 - Bacterial Endospores Are A Survival StrategyChapter 4 - Archaeal Cell StructureChapter 4.1 - Archaea Are Diverse But Share Some Common FeaturesChapter 4.2 - Archaeal Cell Envelopes Are Structurally DiverseChapter 4.3 - Archaeal Cytoplasm Is Similar To Bacterial CytoplasmChapter 4.4 - Many Archaea Have External Structures Used For Attachment And MotilityChapter 5 - Eukaryotic Cell StructureChapter 5.1 - Eukaryotic Cells Are Diverse But Share Some Common FeaturesChapter 5.3 - The Eukaryotic Cytoplasm Contains A Cytoskeleton And OrganellesChapter 5.4 - Several Organelles Function In The Secretory And Endocytic PathwaysChapter 5.5 - The Nucleus And Ribosomes Are Involved In Genetic Control Of The CellChapter 5.6 - Mitochondria, Related Organelles, And Chloroplasts Are Involved In Energy ConservationChapter 5.7 - Many Eukaryotic Microbes Have External Structures Used For MotilityChapter 5.8 - Comparison Of Bacterial, Archaeal, And Eukaryotic CellsChapter 6 - Viruses And Other Acellular Infectious AgentsChapter 6.2 - Virion Structure Is Defined By Capsid Symmetry And Presence Or Absence Of An EnvelopeChapter 6.3 - Viral Life Cycles Have Five StepsChapter 6.4 - There Are Several Types Of Viral InfectionsChapter 6.5 - Cultivation And Enumeration Of VirusesChapter 6.7 - Prions Are Composed Only Of ProteinChapter 7 - Bacterial And Archaeal GrowthChapter 7.1 - Most Bacteria And Archaea Reproduce By Binary FissionChapter 7.2 - Bacterial Cell Cycles Can Be Divided Into Three PhasesChapter 7.3 - Archaeal Cell Cycles Are UniqueChapter 7.4 - Growth Curves Consist Of Five PhasesChapter 7.5 - Environmental Factors Affect Microbial GrowthChapter 7.6 - Microbial Growth In Natural EnvironmentsChapter 7.7 - Laboratory Culture Of Cellular Microbes Requires Media And Conditions That Mimic The Normal Habitat Of A MicrobeChapter 7.8 - Microbial Population Size Can Be Measured Directly Or IndirectlyChapter 7.9 - Chemostats And Turbidostats Are Used For Continuous Culture Of MicroorganismsChapter 8 - Control Of Microorganisms In The EnvironmentChapter 8.1 - Microbial Growth And Replication: Targets For ControlChapter 8.2 - The Pattern Of Microbial Death Mirrors The Pattern Of Microbial GrowthChapter 8.3 - Mechanical Removal Methods Rely On BarriersChapter 8.4 - Physical Control Methods Alter Microorganisms To Make Them NonviableChapter 8.5 - Microorganisms Are Controlled With Chemical AgentsChapter 8.6 - Antimicrobial Agents Must Be Evaluated For EffectivenessChapter 8.7 - Microorganisms Can Be Controlled By Biological MethodsChapter 9 - Antimicrobial ChemotherapyChapter 9.1 - Antimicrobial Chemotherapy Evolved From Antisepsis EffortsChapter 9.2 - Antimicrobial Drugs Have Selective ToxicityChapter 9.3 - Antimicrobial Activity Can Be Measured By Specific TestsChapter 9.4 - Antibacterial DrugsChapter 9.5 - Antiviral DrugsChapter 9.6 - Antifungal DrugsChapter 9.7 - Antiprotozoan DrugsChapter 9.8 - Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Is A Public Health ThreatChapter 10 - Introduction To MetabolismChapter 10.1 - Metabolism: Important Principles And ConceptsChapter 10.2 - Atp: The Major Energy Currency Of CellsChapter 10.3 - Redox Reactions: Reactions Of Central Importance In MetabolismChapter 10.4 - Electron Transport Chains: Sets Of Sequential Redox ReactionsChapter 10.6 - Enzymes And Ribozymes Speed Up Cellular Chemical ReactionsChapter 10.7 - Metabolism Must Be Regulated To Maintain HomeostasisChapter 11 - Catabolism: Energy Release And ConservationChapter 11.1 - Metabolic Diversity And Nutritional TypesChapter 11.2 - There Are Three Chemoorganotrophic Fueling ProcessesChapter 11.4 - Glucose To Pyruvate: The First StepChapter 11.5 - Pyruvate To Carbon Dioxide (step 2) Is Accomplished By The Tricarboxylic Acid CycleChapter 11.6 - Electron Transport And Oxidative Phosphorylation (step 3) Generate The Most AtpChapter 11.7 - Anaerobic Respiration Uses The Same Three Steps As Aerobic RespirationChapter 11.8 - Fermentation Does Not Involve An Electron Transport ChainChapter 11.9 - Catabolism Of Organic Molecules Other Than GlucoseChapter 11.11 - Flavin-based Electron BifurcationChapter 11.12 - PhototrophyChapter 12 - Anabolism: The Use Of Energy In BiosynthesisChapter 12.1 - Principles Governing BiosynthesisChapter 12.3 - Co2 Fixation: Reduction And Assimilation Of Co2 CarbonChapter 12.4 - Synthesis Of CarbohydratesChapter 12.5 - Synthesis Of Amino Acids Consumes Many Precursor MetabolitesChapter 12.6 - Synthesis Of Purines, Pyrimidines, And NucleotidesChapter 12.7 - Lipid SynthesisChapter 13 - Bacterial Genome Replication And ExpressionChapter 13.1 - Experiments Using Bacteria And Viruses Demonstrated That Dna Is The Genetic MaterialChapter 13.2 - Nucleic Acid And Protein StructureChapter 13.3 - Dna Replication In BacteriaChapter 13.4 - Bacterial Genes Consist Of Coding Regions And Other Sequences Important For Gene FunctionChapter 13.5 - Transcription In BacteriaChapter 13.6 - The Genetic Code Consists Of Three-letter “words”Chapter 13.7 - Translation In BacteriaChapter 13.8 - Protein Maturation And SecretionChapter 14 - Regulation Of Bacterial Cellular ProcessesChapter 14.2 - Regulation Of Transcription Initiation Saves Considerable Energy And MaterialsChapter 14.3 - Attenuation And Riboswitches Stop Transcription PrematurelyChapter 14.4 - Riboswitches And Small Rnas Control TranslationChapter 14.5 - Mechanisms Used For Global RegulationChapter 14.6 - Bacteria Combine Several Regulatory Mechanisms To Control Complex Cellular ProcessesChapter 15 - Eukaryotic And Archaeal Genome Replication And ExpressionChapter 15.2 - Dna Replication: Similar Overall, But With Different Replisome ProteinsChapter 15.3 - TranscriptionChapter 15.4 - Translation And Protein Maturation And LocalizationChapter 15.5 - Regulation Of Cellular ProcessesChapter 16 - Mechanisms Of Genetic VariationChapter 16.1 - Mutations: Heritable Changes In A GenomeChapter 16.2 - Detection And Isolation Of MutantsChapter 16.3 - Dna Repair Maintains Genome StabilityChapter 16.4 - Microbes Use Mechanisms Other Than Mutation To Create Genetic VariabilityChapter 16.5 - Transposable Elements Move Genes Within And Between Dna MoleculesChapter 16.6 - Bacterial Conjugation Requires Cell-cell ContactChapter 16.7 - Bacterial Transformation Is The Uptake Of Free Dna From The EnvironmentChapter 16.8 - Transduction Is Virus-mediated Dna TransferChapter 16.9 - Evolution In Action: The Development Of Antibiotic Resistance In BacteriaChapter 17 - Microbial Dna TechnologiesChapter 17.1 - Key Discoveries Led To The Development Of Dna Cloning TechnologyChapter 17.2 - Polymerase Chain Reaction Amplifies Targeted DnaChapter 17.3 - Genomic Libraries: Cloning Genomes In PiecesChapter 17.4 - Expressing Foreign Genes In Host CellsChapter 17.5 - Cas9 Nuclease Is A Precise Tool For Genome EditingChapter 18 - Microbial GenomicsChapter 18.1 - Dna Sequencing MethodsChapter 18.2 - Genome SequencingChapter 18.3 - Metagenomics Provides Access To Uncultured MicrobesChapter 18.4 - Bioinformatics: What Does The Sequence Mean?Chapter 18.5 - Functional Genomics Links Genes To PhenotypeChapter 18.7 - Comparative GenomicsChapter 19 - Microbial Taxonomy And The Evolution Of DiversityChapter 19.1 - Microbial Taxonomy Is Based On The Comparison Of Multiple TraitsChapter 19.2 - Taxonomic Ranks Provide An Organizational FrameworkChapter 19.3 - Microbial Taxonomy And Phylogeny Are Largely Based On Molecular CharacterizationChapter 19.4 - Phylogenetic Trees Illustrate Evolutionary RelationshipsChapter 19.5 - Evolutionary Processes And The Concept Of A Microbial Species Inspire DebateChapter 19.6 - Bergey’s Manual Of Systematics Of Archaea And BacteriaChapter 20 - ArchaeaChapter 20.1 - Overview Of ArchaeaChapter 20.2 - Proteoarchaeota, Or Tack SuperphylumChapter 20.3 - Phylum Euryarchaeota: Methanogens, Haloarchaea, And OthersChapter 21 - Nonproteobacterial Gram-negative BacteriaChapter 21.3 - Class Mollicutes, Phylum Tenericutes: Bacteria That Lack Cell WallsChapter 21.4 - Photosynthetic Bacteria Are DiverseChapter 21.5 - Superphylum Planctomycetes-verrucomicrobia-chlamydiae: Atypical Cell DivisionChapter 21.7 - Phylum Bacteroidetes Includes Important Gut MicrobiotaChapter 21.8 - Phylum Fusobacteria: Commensal AnaerobesChapter 22 - ProteobacteriaChapter 22.1 - Class Alphaproteobacteria Includes Many OligotrophsChapter 22.2 - Class Betaproteobacteria Includes Chemoheterotrophs And ChemolithotrophsChapter 22.3 - Class Gammaproteobacteria Is The Largest Bacterial ClassChapter 22.4 - Class Deltaproteobacteria Includes Chemoheterotrophic Anaerobes And PredatorsChapter 22.5 - Class Epsilonproteobacteria Ranges From Pathogens To Deep-sea BacteriaChapter 23 - Gram-positive BacteriaChapter 23.1 - Class ActinobacteriaChapter 23.2 - Class Bacilli: Aerobic Endospore-forming BacteriaChapter 23.3 - Class Clostridia: Anaerobic Endospore-forming BacteriaChapter 23.4 - Class Negativicutes: Gram-positive Bacteria With Outer MembranesChapter 24 - ProtistsChapter 24.1 - Protist Diversity Reflects Broad PhylogenyChapter 24.2 - Supergroup Excavata: Primitive EukaryotesChapter 24.3 - Supergroup Amoebozoa Includes Protists With PseudopodiaChapter 24.4 - Supergroup Sar: Protists Of Global ImportanceChapter 24.5 - Supergroup Archaeplastida Includes “green Algae”Chapter 25 - FungiChapter 25.1 - Fungal Biology Reflects Vast DiversityChapter 25.2 - Chytridiomycetes Produce Motile SporesChapter 25.4 - Glomeromycota Are Mycorrhizal SymbiontsChapter 25.5 - Ascomycota Includes Yeasts And MoldsChapter 25.6 - Basidiomycota Includes Mushrooms And Plant PathogensChapter 25.7 - Microsporidia Are Intracellular ParasitesChapter 26 - VirusesChapter 26.1 - Virus Phylogeny Is Difficult To EstablishChapter 26.2 - Double-stranded Dna Viruses Infect All Cell TypesChapter 26.3 - Single-stranded Dna Viruses Use A Double-stranded Intermediate In Their Life CyclesChapter 26.4 - Double-stranded Rna Viruses: Rnadependent Rna Polymerase Replicates The Genome And Synthesizes MrnaChapter 26.5 - Plus-strand Rna Viruses: Genomes That Can Be Translated Upon EntryChapter 26.6 - Minus-strand Rna Viruses: Rnadependent Rna Polymerase Is Part Of The VirionChapter 26.7 - Retroviruses: Plus-strand Viruses That Use Reverse Transcriptase In Their Life CyclesChapter 26.8 - Reverse Transcribing Dna VirusesChapter 27 - Microbial InteractionsChapter 27.2 - Mutualism And Cooperation Are Two-way InteractionsChapter 27.3 - Commensalism And Amensalism Are One-way InteractionsChapter 27.4 - Antagonistic Interactions Characterize Predation, Parasitism, And CompetitionChapter 28 - Biogeochemical Cycling And Global Climate ChangeChapter 28.1 - Biogeochemical Cycling Sustains Life On EarthChapter 28.2 - Global Climate Change: Biogeochemical Cycling Out Of BalanceChapter 29 - Methods In Microbial EcologyChapter 29.1 - Microbial Biology Relies On CulturesChapter 29.2 - Genetic Methods Are Used To Assess Microbial DiversityChapter 29.3 - Assessment Of Microbial Community Activity Relies On Biochemistry And GeneticsChapter 30 - Microorganisms In Marine And Freshwater EcosystemsChapter 30.1 - Water Is The Largest Microbial HabitatChapter 30.2 - Microorganisms In Marine EcosystemsChapter 30.3 - Microorganisms In Freshwater EcosystemsChapter 31 - Microorganisms In Terrestrial EcosystemsChapter 31.1 - Soils Are An Important Microbial HabitatChapter 31.2 - Diverse Microorganisms Inhabit SoilChapter 31.3 - Microbe-plant Interactions Can Be Positive, Negative, Or NeutralChapter 31.4 - The Subsurface Biosphere Is VastChapter 32 - Innate Host ResistanceChapter 32.1 - Immunity Arises From Innate Resistance And Adaptive DefensesChapter 32.2 - Innate Resistance Starts With BarriersChapter 32.3 - Innate Resistance Relies On Chemical MediatorsChapter 32.4 - Each Type Of Innate Immune Cell Has A Specific FunctionChapter 32.5 - Organs And Tissues Of The Immune System Are Sites Of Host DefenseChapter 32.6 - Phagocytosis Destroys InvadersChapter 32.7 - Inflammation Unites All Components Of ImmunityChapter 33 - Adaptive ImmunityChapter 33.2 - Antigens Elicit ImmunityChapter 33.3 - Adaptive Immunity Can Be Earned Or BorrowedChapter 33.4 - Recognition Of Foreignness Is Critical For A Strong DefenseChapter 33.5 - T Cells Are Critical For Immune FunctionChapter 33.6 - B Cells Make AntibodiesChapter 33.7 - Antibodies Bind Specific 3-d AntigensChapter 33.8 - Antibodies Doom AntigensChapter 33.9 - Immune Tolerance Is A MustChapter 33.10 - The Immune System Can MalfunctionChapter 34 - The Microbe-human EcosystemChapter 34.1 - Humans Are HolobiontsChapter 34.2 - The Microbiome Develops From Birth To AdulthoodChapter 34.3 - A Functional Core Microbiome Is Required For Human HomeostasisChapter 34.4 - Many Diseases Have A Connection With DysbiosisChapter 34.5 - Microbiome Manipulation Can Be TherapeuticChapter 35 - Infection And PathogenicityChapter 35.1 - The Process Of InfectionChapter 35.2 - Transmission And Entry Into The HostChapter 35.3 - Surviving The Host DefensesChapter 35.4 - Damage To The HostChapter 36 - Epidemiology And Public Health MicrobiologyChapter 36.2 - Epidemiology Is Rooted In Well-tested MethodsChapter 36.3 - Infectious Disease Is Revealed Through Patterns Within A PopulationChapter 36.4 - Infectious Diseases And Pathogens Are Emerging And ReemergingChapter 36.5 - Healthcare Facilities Harbor Infectious AgentsChapter 36.7 - Bioterrorism Readiness Is An Integral Component Of Public Health MicrobiologyChapter 37 - Clinical Microbiology And ImmunologyChapter 37.2 - Identification Of Microorganisms From SpecimensChapter 37.3 - Immune Responses Can Be Exploited To Detect InfectionsChapter 38 - Human Diseases Caused By Viruses And PrionsChapter 38.1 - Viruses Can Be Transmitted By Airborne RoutesChapter 38.3 - Direct Contact Diseases Can Be Caused By VirusesChapter 38.4 - Food And Water Are Vehicles For Viral DiseasesChapter 38.5 - Zoonotic Diseases Arise From Human-animal InteractionsChapter 38.6 - Prion Proteins Transmit DiseaseChapter 39 - Human Diseases Caused By BacteriaChapter 39.1 - Bacteria Can Be Transmitted By Airborne RoutesChapter 39.2 - Arthropods Can Transmit Bacterial DiseasesChapter 39.3 - Direct Contact Diseases Can Be Caused By BacteriaChapter 39.4 - Food And Water Are Vehicles For Bacterial DiseasesChapter 39.5 - Zoonotic Diseases Arise From Human-animal InteractionsChapter 39.6 - Opportunistic Diseases Can Be Caused By BacteriaChapter 40 - Human Diseases Caused By Fungi And ProtistsChapter 40.2 - Fungi Can Be Transmitted By Airborne RoutesChapter 40.3 - Arthropods Can Transmit Protozoal DiseaseChapter 40.4 - Direct Contact Diseases Can Be Caused By Fungi And ProtistsChapter 40.5 - Food And Water Are Vehicles Of Protozoal DiseasesChapter 40.6 - Opportunistic Diseases Can Be Caused By Fungi And ProtistsChapter 41 - Microbiology Of FoodChapter 41.1 - Microbial Growth Can Cause Food SpoilageChapter 41.2 - Various Methods Are Used To Control Food SpoilageChapter 41.3 - Food-borne Disease OutbreaksChapter 41.4 - Detection Of Food-borne Pathogens Requires Government-industry CooperationChapter 41.5 - Microbiology Of Fermented Foods: Beer, Cheese, And Much MoreChapter 42 - Biotechnology And Industrial MicrobiologyChapter 42.1 - Microbes Are The Source Of Many Products Of Industrial ImportanceChapter 42.2 - Biofuel Production Is A Dynamic FieldChapter 42.3 - Growing Microbes In Industrial Settings Presents ChallengesChapter 42.4 - Production Strains Maximize Output Of Industrially Important CompoundsChapter 42.5 - Agricultural Biotechnology Relies On A Plant PathogenChapter 42.6 - Some Microbes Are ProductsChapter 43 - Applied Environmental MicrobiologyChapter 43.1 - Purification And Sanitary Analysis Ensure Safe Drinking WaterChapter 43.2 - Wastewater Treatment Maintains Human And Environmental HealthChapter 43.3 - Microbial Fuel Cells: Batteries Powered By MicrobesChapter 43.4 - Biodegradation And Bioremediation Harness Microbes To Clean The Environment

Sample Solutions for this Textbook

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No.CharacteristicsMetabolismCatabolismAnabolism1DefinitionMetabolism is the process that describe...The following are the differences between metabolism, catabolism, and anabolism:...The following are the differences between catabolism, metabolism, and anabolism:...The definitions of some terms used in genetics: Genome: The genome is described as the genetic...The enzyme activity must be regulated to maintain balance among various cellular components. The...The genetic material of bacteria is found suspended in the cytoplasm or the nucleoid (nucleus-like...A nucleotide can be defined as the combined form of nucleoside and a phosphate group. It forms both...The provided figure shows four steps that are involved in the cloning of a gene. These steps...The DNA (deoxyribose nucleic acid) is made up of stacks of nucleotides that are joined to each other...The DNA (deoxyribose nucleic acid) is made up of stacks of nucleotides that are joined to each other...Pictorial representation: Figure 1 represents phylogenetic tree of life-based on SSU rRNA. Fig.1:...Pictorial representation: Fig.1: Diagrammatic representation of the cell wall of Gram-negative...Pictorial representation: Figure.1 illustrate the Diagrammatic representation of the cell wall of...Pictorial representation: Fig.1: The structure of gram positive cell. The gram positive cells are...Pictorial representation: Fig.1; The eukaryotic cell envelope and its constituents. The eukaryotic...The cell envelope consists of the plasma membrane and the coverings that are present outside it....Virions are mainly composed of nucleocapsid containing deoxyribonucleic acid or ribonucleic acid and...There are various environmental factors that affect the rate of the growth of microorganisms. Such...There are different nutrients essential for the growth of microorganisms. For example: iron is one...The difference between defined media culture and complex culture media is as follows:...Microbes are the key factors regulating various types of gases in the environment, which these...Numerous environmental factors affect or influence the growth or the death rate of microbes. The...Eukaryotic cells are those cells that have a true nucleus and have membrane-bound organelles,...The cell biology of eukaryotes is described below: The eukaryotes share a wide morphological...S.noCharacteristicsFacultative anaerobesObligate anaerobesStrict anaerobes1.DefinitionIt is an...A wide variety of microbes which lives in web communities and involve organisms from another system...The antimicrobial chemotherapy involves the use of antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral drugs...Pathogen transmission and infection take place through a series of steps. The steps begin from the...The study of different diseases that might be caused by the virus vector is termed as virology. The...The bacteria are of four basic shapes, namely, coccus (spherical), bacillus (rod-shaped), vibrio...The branch of biology that deals with the study of eukaryotic organisms and species are known as...Aerobes and anaerobes (facultative or strict) both perform cellular respiration and utilize glucose...There are various types of microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, that produces many employed...Cholera is a serious water-borne disease that is caused by Vibrio cholera. The bacterium is a spiral...

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Prescott's Microbiology
10th Edition
ISBN: 9781259281594
Prescott’s Microbiology
8th Edition
ISBN: 9780077350130
PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY
12th Edition
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PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY
12th Edition
ISBN: 9781265907266
Prescott's Microbiology
12th Edition
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PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY (LL)-W/CONNECT
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Loose Leaf for Prescott's Microbiology
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PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY WITH PROCTORIO
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PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY-CONNECT ACCESS
12th Edition
ISBN: 9781264776122
Connect With Learnsmart Labs Online Access For Prescott's Microbiology
11th Edition
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CUSTOM PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY
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Prescott's Microbiology
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ISBN: 9781260409062
PRESCOTT'S MICROBILOGY
11th Edition
ISBN: 9781264075515
PRESCOTT'S MICROBIO W/PROCTORIO
11th Edition
ISBN: 9781264731060
PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY
11th Edition
ISBN: 9781264073375
PRESCOTT'S MICROBIOLOGY
11th Edition
ISBN: 2818440045677
Prescott's Microbiology
9th Edition
ISBN: 9780073402406
Prescott/harley/klein's Microbiology
7th Edition
ISBN: 9780073302089