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    2001 : A Space Odyssey

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    “2001: A space Odyssey” opens in the African Rift Valley, where a tribe of hominids encounter a stone monument which has obstructed on their domain. This stone monument transmits radio waves that end up expanding their IQ 's, teaching them weaponry and other tool uses to help them live, as they proceed to defeat a rival tribe. Four million years later, we see the luxurious space travel that the vintage science fiction of the 1960’s, with space stations for air terminals and such. Dr. Heywood Floyd

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    his Arthur C. Clark collaboration, 2001: A Space Odyssey. The MGM film is known for it’s striking imagery mostly because, upon an audience member’s first viewing, it is the only thing that actually makes sense. After the second or third viewing, though, one realizes that the story is something larger than life. Or at least it is larger than the human race. 2001 tells the story of evolution and the future that humans might eventually encounter. The plot of 2001: A Space Odyssey is complex. The basic

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    these great works. “2001: A Space Odyssey” by Stanley Kubrick is an example of such as it is based upon the literary short story, “The Sentinel” by Arthur C. Clarke. Kubrick has done an astounding job at developing the original short story by combining music with visual images way before it’s time. The film allows its viewers to see the original short story told by Clarke, creatively expanded and elaborated upon in comparison with great detail. Table of Contents Introduction

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    2001: A Space Odyssey is a novel like no other. It entices the reader to read more after finishing every chapter, whilst providing facts about the universe that may be viewed as dull when explained outside the novel. It combines a reader’s love for complex characters, such as Hal, with an intricate plot surrounding extraterrestrial life, and finally a lingering feeling of the unknown when the novel finishes. One theme in this novel was most certainly the perils of technology. The novel explores technological

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    Arthur C. Clarke’s 1951 short story “The Sentinel” is a basis for Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece 1968 movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. As a result, both stories partially share the same theme and parts of the plot; nonetheless, the movie expands the theme and the plot of the short story, while the latter focuses mainly on the communication of the importance of the discovery. Due to the difference in forms, the two stories use methods most suitable for each of them to communicate the most important moments

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    2001: A Space Odyssey ‘The Dawn of Man’ sequence is based in a prehistoric time period and the most important theme of this sequence is nature. Kubrick shows the two stages of nature before showing us as the audience how humans evolved as a species. The various shots of land are staged in altered settings within different time zones, which express the Earth as a large place. With no characters and no type of dialogue, the non-diegetic sound of birds chirping is a representation of nature. The sound

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    the film. “2001: A Space Odyssey” is an ambiguous film. The broad range of audience captures various interpretations of the film. The main theme seems to be about the evolutionary process of mankind interwoven with elements of a higher or extraterrestrial entity guiding this evolution. There are some film theories that suggest this movie was all propaganda used in conjunction with the space race that occurred during World War 2. Some even go as far as to say that the same set used in “2001: A Space

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    Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” is largely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential films ever made, especially when it comes to the science-fiction genre. It is Kubrick’s intriguing and unique take on the human life when it comes into conflict with many things like human behavior, social orders, and technology. Even though many films revolve around the idea of humanity, Kubrick takes it to a completely other level, by exploring the outer limits in which human beings reside

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    Although Stanley Kubrick's film, 2001: A Space Odyssey, was first shown in theaters in 1968, it is still thought to be one of the single most phenomenal films ever released. For this reason, the film is shown in schools throughout the country, providing an example of exclusive style and visual breakthroughs. Kubrick avoids the use of dialogue throughout most of the film, displaying to people the importance of pure visuals and music. 2001: A Space Odyssey is paced at a slow and meticulous manner,

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    2001: A Space Odyssey      The following paper will analyze the movie, “2001: A Space Odyssey” by Stanley Kubrick” and “The Centinel” by Arthur C. Clarke. Although there are many themes present between the story and the film, the following are the most dominant. I will be discussing Scientific themes, Religious and Moral Themes, and Clarke’s development of the short story into a full-length film.      The first issue, I will be discussing the scientific

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