A New England Nun Essay

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    An Analytical Essay of “A New England Nun” by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman Independence is an empowering state where one feels no need to rely on another. In the short story “A New England Nun,” Mary E. Wilkins Freeman demonstrates the internal struggle of a woman accustomed to being solitary that she feels confined by her upcoming marriage. The author presents the characterizations effectively through Louisa’s internal independence, the comfort she has with her household, the relationship she built with

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    to the male figure. Each work deals with conflicting views of the female protagonist and the expectations of their male counter-character, though each has a differing outcome that correlates to the woman’s reaction to this male supremacy. “A New England Nun” features Louisa and Joe Dagget, who come to a mutual agreement to call of their engagement. This ending follows closely with realism, as there is a healthy development and closure to the conflict. Then, Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants”

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    Couch, Ben. "The no-Man's-Land of "A New England Nun"." Studies in Short Fiction 35.2 (1998): 187-98. ProQuest. Web. 25 Jan. 2017. (B) This source will fit into my essay by helping me establish the fact that Louisa is, in fact, a compulsive character by outlining her behavior as being precise, organized, and compulsive, as well as depicting her traits of perfectionism. This source will be used in my introduction paragraph as well as body paragraphs. (A) Elbert, Monika M. "The Displacement of Desire:

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    women they were not to socialize in their free time, they were expected to do other things to “better” the home such as sewing socks or doing laundry. Very few women had the same educational opportunities as men. “The Yellow Wallpaper” and “A New England Nun” are very good examples of how things were for women and the American culture at the turn of the century and in each of these stories the women were able to defeat the patriarchal culture represented in their husband and soon to be husband. “The

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    do much without their Husband or another male figure in their life , they really didn’t have a voice of their own. In the stories A New England Nun , Desiree’s Baby, The Story of an Hour, and The Storm, Mary and Kate have represented how this situation of the society affected women and their viewpoints about life and marriage. Mary Wilkins Freeman’s A New England Nun and Kate Chopin’s Desiree’s Baby, The Story of an Hour, and The Storm have very comparable qualities that make it efficient to relate

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    this and made a name for herself in the mid-1880s. She grew up in a home of orthodox Congregationalists and was expected to have very strict behavior. The roles in society for women during this time are key subjects in Freeman’s stories. In, “A New England Nun,” Freeman expresses the pressure and constraints of the obligation put on women to marry. The first encounter of Joe Dagget and Louisa Ellis is so awkward. “He sat bolt-upright, toeing out his heavy feet squarely, glancing with a good-humored

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    Although women may appear fragile, docile, and porous to the desires of men, their course of action as they overcome their adversity would prove their character to be strong, willful, and self-reliant. Authors Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, in “The England Nun,” and Nella Larsen, in “Sanctuary,” portray protagonists that exhibit characteristics of strong-will and independence that resist the social confinements of their time. In both cases, the protagonists have to overcome the obstacle that is classified

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    Critical Analysis Paper In Mary E. Wilkins Freeman’s short story, “A New England Nun,” she writes about a woman who is very independent, but is unsure about marriage. The theme of “A New England Nun,” would be independence. Freeman states many different examples of independence in her short story. When Freeman is talking about how Louisa Ellis’s mom and brother had died, she shows that Louisa is very independent for living alone at that age. Also the story talks about how Louisa uses china at night

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    Need for an Heir

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    The want and need for an heir can be a powerful desire and drive men to drastic measures. It was the reason behind the decision of King Henry VIII of England to pass the Act of supremacy in 1534, which declared and recognized that he the king, “was the only supreme head of the Church of England called Anglicana Ecclesia” (History of the Monarchy). After falling in love with Anne Boleyn and needing an heir, King Henry VIII wanted the Pope to annul his marriage with Catherine of Aragon on the basis

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    continued uninterrupted. Several orders of nuns provided nursing services in hospitals.[14] A leadership role was taken by the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, founded in France in 1633. New orders of Catholic nuns expanded the range of activities and reached new areas. For example in rural Brittany in France, the Daughters of the Holy Spirit, created in 1706, played a central role. New opportunity for nuns as charitable practitioners was created The nuns provided comprehensive care for the

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