Art Comparison Essay Example

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    Art Comparison

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    Art is an incredible medium when used to its fullest potential. What I mean by that is; it has the capabilities to surround the viewer with its imagery and play with the emotions. Paintings are particulary effective in doing this through the use of color tones and ‘temperature’. For example; El Greco used a lot of blue and green throughout his body of work. The outcome is that the subject matter comes off as ghostly and perhaps a little alien. This is in high contrast to Georgia O’Keeffe’s desert

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    Comparison and Contrast of Art Art is able to transport its viewer through time and connect us as a community. Audiences are able to infer the content and context of the artwork. Art displayed through different mediums and about different topics can share many similarities and draw connections between one another. Exodus, created by Shelby Lechman (2015), uses oil paint on canvas to depict a young boy and father in a train car, leaving their home in Hungary during the time of the Hungarian Revolution

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    American Art Comparison

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    I am comparing and contrasting two pieces of American artwork. The two pieces are called “Sun Bath” by Grace Ballentine and “Untitled” in which the artist is unknown. First, I am comparing the two pieces of art. Some of the similarities are that they were made about the same time period. “Sun Bath” was made in 1946 and “Untitled” was made around 1933-1943. Also both of the pieces contain animals. “Sun Bath” has a cat and “Untitled” has two wolves. Another similarity is that they are both in black

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    If one was to describe the Roman art, in my opinion the words realistic, and functional, would give it judgment; which perhaps would describe rather well the pragmatic Romans. Undoubtedly, both the painting and sculpture has its own purpose, and a unique place in society; the Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci, has rather explicit opinion on the topic: “A sculptor says that his art is more worthy than painting because, fearing humidity, fire, heat, and cold less than painting, it is more eternal

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    Sculpture: Khafre Enthroned to Kritios Boy Early Egyptian art from the Old Kingdom, ca. 2575-2134 BCE, demonstrates uniform structure. Egyptian artists and sculptors adhered to a system of strict rules known as canon to create this consistency. The Egyptian canon suggested perfection to be a rigid, ageless idealization of reality. Roughly 1,500 years later, a progressive canon emerged in Greek art reflecting new ideals of perfection. Greek art beginning in the Early Classical Period, ca. 480- 450 BCE

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    The building I chose to compare with the Art Deco period is the Café l’Aubette. This café shows the De Stijl movement that was designed by Theo van Doesburg. The café shows a lot of geometric patterns and is colorful to show a contemporary look to the building. The goal that Theo van Doesburg wanted to achieve in the café was to create a space that people feel like they are part of the painting on the walls that surround them. The exterior of the building is brick with minimum ornamentation and arched

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    Contrast: Art to Food The boundaries of art and food are being pushed each day. As boundaries are pushed, the line between food and art becomes smaller, almost non-existent. Existence is a construct made by man, just as the creations of food and art. In the twenty-first century, nothing is positive and everything is arbitrary. People are less worried with how everything looks, but more concerned with the emotional impact they receive. Art is food and food is art. Webster’s dictionary defines art as “the

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    According to Oxford Dictionary, the definition of perfection is “The action or process of improving something until it is faultless.” In art, the striving for perfection has always been changing back and forth in a continuous cycle between realism and impressionism. Artworks that point to this idea include Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain, and Damien Hirst’s The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living. Through Duchamp’s work, the viewer gets a face-to-face interaction with something

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    The book Art and Fear by David Bayles and Ted Orland is simply put a guide to your own art. According to the authors’ art is not easy. We as humans make art hard and we assume certain beliefs that just are not true. These beliefs get in the way of making our art. They can lead artists to quitting and stopping when the goals are reached; never going beyond their dreams. People begin to fear not only the process of art, but the repercussions of art itself. We fear that what we envision is not what

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    John Maizel’s “Dubuffet and Art Brut” highlights Dubuffet’s passionate belief in a new art movement that was raw, untouched, and attracted many academic artists. Art Brut is the French definition of Art Brut. Because it is the most direct and unrestricted art form. Not only were the works original and self thought but their creators did not follow common social and cultural norms. During the post world war II, the concept of "civilization" has merely been the justification for colonialism, imperialism

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