C.S. Lewis Essay

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  • The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis

    567 Words  | 2 Pages

    In The Great Divorce, C.S. Lewis provides an allegorical description of a dreamers journey from hell to heaven. The Narrator of the book takes a journey on a bus from the grey town, hell, to just outside of heaven. While he is making this trip from the grey town to heaven, he converses with some of his fellow travelers. These travelers are all different, yet all have the mindset of not being able to leave the darkness of the grey town and go to the joy that is heaven. Through his talent in story-telling

  • A Brief Biography of C.S. Lewis

    827 Words  | 3 Pages

    C.S. Lewis is one of the greatest authors in history. His books are still widely available and sold to many interested readers. In Lewis’ childhood, he experienced a tragedy that affected his belief in god; in his middle life, he mainly focused on college and his studies, but his father’s death played a role in Lewis later becoming a Christian. In Lewis’ later life, he married one of his own fans. Clive’s passion for writing began when he was a small child, and it continued to grow as he furthered

  • Symbols in 'Perelandra' by C.S. Lewis

    1932 Words  | 5 Pages

    Symbols and Themes in C.S. Lewis 's "Perelandra" British author C.S. Lewis 's "Perelandra" is one of the most religiously relevant fantasy novels ever written. Set on the exotic planet of Perelandra (Venus), it contains within its pages the Creation legend of Adam and Eve, set in our time but in a different world. "Perelandra" is a story of an unspoiled world, the Garden of Eden denied to the residents of earth but still open to the two inhabitants of Perelandra. C.S. Lewis uses this unspoiled planet

  • C.S. Lewis on Misunderstanding Fantasy Essay

    4960 Words  | 20 Pages

    C.S. Lewis on Misunderstanding Fantasy “Good stories often introduce the marvelous or supernatural and nothing about Story has been so often misunderstood as this.” On Stories—C.S. Lewis The early decades of the last century saw the loss of credibility of fantasy literature among the academic elite who ruled it a popular genre with little to no scholarly merit. Little that had had the misfortune of being dubbed fantasy had escaped the blacklist cast upon the field. Many

  • Essay on The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

    2922 Words  | 12 Pages

    In C.S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Lewis emphasizes the three points of philosophy, themes, and symbolism throughout his writing. Lewis was a strong Christian man, and wanted to make children see and understand all the stories of the Bible. Therefore, he put Christian elements through his books, but with fantasy characters as well. Especially in this story, Lewis conveys the differences between good and evil. Aslan is represented as Christ just as the White Witch represents the

  • Perelandra by C.S. Lewis Essay

    1389 Words  | 6 Pages

    Perelandra Setting The setting of this story takes place on the planet Prelandra, also known as Venus. This planet consists of many floating islands. The islands are quite beautiful, the clouds are purple and the sky is a golden color, the seawater is green and drinkable, from the distance the water looks like glided glass. The islands are not very stable, and they can shake if water hits the mobile islands. All of the islands are mobile, except the main island, which remains stationary. Maledil

  • Out of the Silent Planet by C.S. Lewis Essay

    1238 Words  | 5 Pages

    Out of the Silent Planet by C.S. Lewis In the year 1625, Francis Bacon, a famous essayist and poet wrote about the influences of fear on everyday life. He stated, “Men fear death as children fear to go in the dark; and as that natural fear in children is increased with tales, so is the other” (Essays Dedication of Death). Clearly, external surroundings affect perceptions of fear as well as human nature in general. Although C.S. Lewis published the novel, Out of the Silent Planet, over three

  • The Manifestation of Pride in The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis

    1271 Words  | 6 Pages

    by C.S. Lewis The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis suggests that choices made on earth have a consequential effect towards our acceptance into heaven or our plummet into hell. In this book pride manifests itself in a hundred subtle ways as souls whine about perceived injustices or irrational motives. Thankfully, a few tourists do humble themselves, become transformed into marvelously real beings, and remain in heaven. But most don't, about which the great Scottish author George MacDonald, Lewis' heavenly

  • Heave in Hell in C.S. Lewis´ The Great Divorce Essay

    1010 Words  | 5 Pages

    In his novel The Great Divorce, C.S. Lewis depicts two settings: one of a grey town where whatever you want is provided for you and another of grand pasture. These settings, in the book, represent Heaven in Hell in a way, depending on which character's perspective the places are viewed from. However, the places that the main character visits and the journey that he takes is one that can be used to model the journey of our spiritual walk. Similar to how the protagonist starts in a bleak town then

  • Christian Truths in the Screwtape Lettters by C.S. Lewis Essay

    927 Words  | 4 Pages

    The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis is a book of thirty –one letters in which a retired, senior demon named Screwtape coaches his newly educated nephew, Wormwood. Wormwood is quite troubled when it comes to tempting his “patient.” Nevertheless, he need not fear because faithful uncle Screwtape has offered his services. A unique character featured in the letters is, “The Enemy.” This character refers to God, the natural enemy of Satan. Of course Satan is referred to as “Our Lord.” In the letters,

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