Detroit Essay

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    Reputation In Detroit

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    Katie Kop Mrs. Yegge AP English 6th hour 13 April 2017 “Detroit: Is a Comeback in Store?” Reputations can be very deceiving.  They cause you to think a certain way about something without forming your own opinion first.  Reputations are like stereotypes: they both make you conform to other people's views about a subject without getting to know it for yourself.  The city of Detroit falls victim to having a bad reputation.  The Motor City is known as being corrupt and left for dead; it is called hopeless

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    thinking. If Detroit is not revitalized and branded it has been said that Michigan as a whole cannot rebrand. Detroit is the city that most people outside of the state look at and determine Michigan’s prominence, domination and future. Rather right or wrong that is simply the way that it is. Michigan over the past few years has attempted to gut the city of what they perceive as the ugliness of Detroit, people in poverty. In this attempt most of the people whom had to leave Detroit because of unemployment

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    Detroit, Michigan once stood as the epitome of industrial American cities. In the mid 1990s Detroit had the highest income per capita and a booming automotive industry. During prohibition in the 1920s Detroit served as a major gateway for the importation of alcohol from Canada, whereby it thrived from this lucrative business. Also, around this same time the automotive industry was growing at a pace where jobs were begging to be filled, and the population of Detroit rose to nearly 2,000,000. There

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    The City of Detroit became the largest city in United States history to filed for Chapter 9 bankruptcy in the amount was 20 billion dollars (Bomey,Priddle,Snavely 2013). How does once an productive city fall so far it has resort to filing for bankruptcy? This story of Detroit's bankruptcy starts in the 1950's. The City of Detroit has its highest population to date which is 1.85 million,which includes 290,000 manufacturing jobs (Weber,2013). With the promise of jobs that the City of Detroit offers, this

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    Detroit, Michigan was originally settled as a French fur trading post that turned into a military post. It was turned over to the British in 1760 after they lost the French and Indian War. In 1796, the British lost Detroit to U.S. forces. Most of this history was lost when a fire destroyed the city in 1805. The invention of the steamboat and the building of the Erie Canal provided efficient access to Detroit through the Detroit River. The city grew rapidly and was incorporated in 1815, even before

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    The city of Detroit was the city of opportunity, wealth and place where anyone could pursue their American dream. In early 1910’s innovative inventor, Henry Ford brought automobile industry into american soil. First and biggest factories of automobile manufacturing was opened in several places in Detroit. Detroit became third biggest city in the United States with largest population during 1950s. Automobile manufacturing was the base of Detroit’s economy for decades. However, today its not like it

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    My Visit To Detroit

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    Station. An icon if there ever was one, representing Detroit’s rise and fall. It is so structurally sound demolition experts say would cost an estimated $5-10 Million just to demolish and anywhere from $100-300 million to renovate. More of an issue for Detroit is finding a function for the forgotten station. It was built by the same architects as New York City’s Grand Central Terminal. In service from 1913 to 1988, The Beaux-Art style was very influential during its conception. There is the train station

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    recession. This impacted Detroit, the Motor City, greatly. Thousands of people were out of work, many companies leaving the area, and the overall moral of the city changed. The ad starts out with shaky footage of an industrial city looking pretty gloomy. This illustrates how many view Detroit. The narrator of the ad starts the monologue of by posing a question, “what does this city know about luxury? Hm?”. This statement use irony to make the audience think. An image of a Detroit Interstate sign is presented

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    Detroit: The Fallen City The city of Detroit, Michigan has always been known as the motor city for its car plants, a.k.a. “The Big Three” and Motown records, a.k.a. “Hitsville U.S.A.”. These are just some of the many things that made Detroit one of the thriving and driven cities within the United States. But as the saying goes, all good things must come to an end Detroit knows this hardship all too well. Detroit a city that once flowed with economic resources now struggles to compete with other

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    Julien Temple in his 2010 documentary, Requiem For Detroit?, brought light to the evolution of the motorcar industry in Detroit and how it affected the development process throughout the state. Detroit’s development was dependent on the modernised industrial revolution that brought forth the expansion of suburban life and growing consumerism. This also came to be known as the ‘American dream’. He also foregrounds to his viewers, what a post capitalist society looks like which came as a result of

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