Dr. Strangelove Essay

Sort By:
Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Decent Essays

    Kubbrick Dr Strangelove

    • 389 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Kubrick dramatizes the absurdity of Cold War Logic throughout the whole movie Dr. Strangelove. In the pre film lecture we talked about the two cornerstone ideas in Cold War America. First, democracy was the “highpoint of human history” and things were based on technological advances. Second, was that communism was the only real danger to America which is why mutually assured destruction (MAD) was created. In this particular scene, Kubrick is using the doomsday machine as a direct representation

    • 389 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Cold War was a period from 1947 to 1991 that adhered erratic tension and constant threat of nuclear conflict between the two remaining superpowers that emerged from WWII, the U.S. and the Soviet Union. The 1964 film Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, directed by Stanley Kubrick, depicts the overlying themes of the Cold War in a comedic fashion. This film’s full embodiment of the Cold War is seen through its representation of the time period, and the sheer competitiveness

    • 1997 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dr. Strangelove is one of the many masterpieces made by the great Stanley Kubrick. The movie was made in 1964 at the Shepperton Studios in London, UK. The time the movie was made is of great importance, in fact, it was made only two years after the Cuban Missile Crisis. Kubrick pictures, in an extremely comical yet somewhat serious way, what the world would look like after one of the two forces (U.S vs. USSR) was triggered in initializing nuclear warfare. General Jack Ripper is an obsessively paranoid

    • 1067 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Dr. Strangelove: Air Force General, Jack D. Ripper, orders his troops to attack a Soviet base. President Muffley brings in the Russian ambassador to the War Room General Turgidson doesn’t trust Ambassador de Sadesky. Thinks he is a spy. Russians have a doomsday device that will destroy the planet if they are attacked. General Turgidson wishes America had a doomsday device. ProQuest Document: On the Cuban Missile Crisis, “The situation would be even graver if there were any LeMay

    • 864 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In “the film “Dr. Strangelove”, Stanley Kubrick took a difficult issue and transformed it into a political comedy. He parodies the dangerous idea of an atomic war and the crazy people who were planning it. Moreover, he tends to the issue of stereotyping. General Jack Ripper is the main character in the film who is in the U.S. Air Force and goes completely insane, and sends bomber wings to destroy the U.S.S.R. He thinks that the communists are conspiring to pollute the "precious bodily fluids" of

    • 1193 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Dr Strangelove Cold War

    • 893 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Dr. Strangelove is a comedy about the Cold War intended for a young adult or adult audience due to the topic of the Cold War not being understood easily by children. The reason for creating this film is for the comedic spin on a very serious historical event, making it truly a one of a kind movie. The point that this director was trying to make was that anything could be seen as funny with the right wording. This could be seen as controversial because war is not something that should be taken lightly

    • 893 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Cold War was a period of several decades of tension and the threat of nuclear conflict between the two remaining superpowers that emerged from WWII, the U.S. and the Soviet Union. The 1964 film Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, directed by Stanley Kubrick, depicts the overlying themes of the Cold War in a comedic fashion. This film’s full embodiment of the Cold War is seen through its representation of the time period, and the sheer competitiveness between

    • 1954 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Exploratory Paper There are many different stances one could take on the subject “Unimpeded technological progress is good for society.”. One could agree with Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove, and Bradbury’s The Veldt and claim that technology is dangerous and will inevitably fall into the wrong hands one day. Another stance would be with Spike Jonze’s Her, which brings forth the opinion that technology is both good and bad. Finally, one’s opinion could lie with George Saunder’s “Offloading for

    • 1067 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Anu Karavadi Professor Morgan AMS 421 3 November 2016 1554 The Importance of Masculine and Feminine in Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) is a dark comedy film by Stanley Kubrick. The film deals with nuclear war which was a hot topic during the 50 's and 60 's. Americans were very paranoid about communists and nuclear war at this time. This film shows how ridiculous the paranoia about nuclear war through a sexual relationship allegory. The

    • 1559 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Decent Essays

    into the scientifically advanced age in which we now live. However, the abilities of these break throughs also had negative capabilities which caused great paranoia throughout the world in the 20th c. In both the novel Cat's Cradle and the film Dr. Strangelove, the creators Vonnegut and Kubrick, respectively, highlight the multifaceted power of scientific progress in the context of satirical pieces of entertainment which are intended to make their audiences aware of problems in the 20th c. world and

    • 876 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
Previous
Page12345678950