Electoral College System Essay

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    Opponents of the Electoral College system also point to the risk of so-called "faithless" Electors. A "faithless Elector" is one who is pledged to vote for his party 's candidate for president but nevertheless votes for another candidate. There have been 7 such Electors in this century and as recently as 1988 when a Democrat Elector in the State of West Virginia cast his votes for Lloyd Bensen for president and Michael Dukakis for vice president instead of the other way around. Faithless Electors

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    Electoral College is a system of voting that requires for certain number to be attached to states as a way determine the voting output of a that state. The number varies from state to state and each assigned electoral college votes are claimed based on the candidate who has the highest number of votes. There are few states in the US that divide their college vote base on the percentage obtain by each participating candidate. In 1787, the constitution met and adapted several systems of electing public

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    Electoral College System Essay

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    The roots of the Electoral College System can be traced way back to more than 200 years. A controversial debate on the effectiveness of Electoral College continues over years. The founders established it as a resolution between president choice by a vote in congress and choice of the president by qualified citizens’ popular vote. 538 electors constituted the Electoral College and 270 majorities of electoral votes choose the president. The United States got its independence from Great Britain, and

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    downsides to our current system. And with every aspect of our system, politicians can come up with loopholes to benefit themselves. We are provided free healthcare, but you must fit certain circumstances in order to receive it. We have the right to a fair trial, but a “fair” trial can quickly become a matter of race, religion, or beliefs. In the same way, our democracy and how we elect our president must be dealt with a tablespoon of salt. The Electoral College is our voting system based off of 538 votes

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    The Electoral College System After the last presidential election, which is still underway apparently, there is much controversy over what should happen to the Electoral College system. There are people who say that the Electoral College is good but should be modified to meet the needs of the modern world. There are those who say that the Electoral College system is too outdated to be modified and should be entirely eliminated. Finally there are those who say that it is has stood the test of

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    It’s interesting to notice that in those four disputed elections of 1800, 1824, 1876 and 1960, the winner of the popular vote didn’t become President because they weren’t the winners of the Electoral College votes. The first two instances were mainly due to an unorganized system because of the early establishment. However, there is a recurring pattern in the later elections. In 1800, the problem was that the electors had two votes, one for President and one for the Vice President, which, based

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    fourth of November an election is taken place to select the next president of the United States. Just recently, in the 2016 election, Hilary Clinton won the popular vote and Donald Trump won the electoral vote, in which he was elected president. This made many Americans question if the electoral college system is outdated and unfair and if the direct popular vote is a more effective way of electing the president. This has happened twice where the candidate who has the popular vote did not win the presidency

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    Analyze criticism of the "Electoral College" system and the alleged advantages and disadvantages of various reform proposals. The Electoral College is a system in which the individual voter does not actually vote directly for the president. When a person votes they are voting for an elector that has pledged their vote or allegiance to the running party. The Framers realized that without widespread communications available at the time and with other varying factors an "each vote counts" or "the

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    quote greatly summarizes what the Electoral College system means; every person in the United States is guaranteed one vote. Everyone should have an equal opportunity to elect who serves in the government, and we are given that opportunity through this system. This is what the Founding Fathers came up with in order to solve the problems they faced over 200 years ago. However, some have opposed this system is not fit for this democracy, and argue that other systems would work more fairly. On the contrary

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    the last two decades. This issue is the apparent flaws of the Electoral College System. The government is capable of functioning with this outdated and flawed system; however, it would function more efficiently if the system was replaced with a system that allowed the president to be elected by a direct popular vote. The only way to accomplish this completely would be to pass an Amendment. The Electoral College is the current system for electing the next president and the process is as follows:

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