Epicurus Essay

Sort By:
Page 1 of 42 - About 412 essays
  • Good Essays

    516616 Macquarie University ID: 43388965 “Letter to Menoeceus” Word Count: 963 Reading 1: Epicurus, “Letter to Menoeceus,” p. 49-50. What argument does he provide for why we should not fear death? What is the ethical purpose of this argument for how we should live our lives? Do you agree with Epicurus’s views? Why or why not? ------------------------------------------------- Epicurus was a hedonist, a materialist and a consequentialist who strongly believed that in order to attain the

    • 1068 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    B099785 Epicurus and Epicureanism (PGHC11181) Epicurus on the Gods: Realism or Idealism? Conflict between two interpretative parties. It is commonly accepted that in antiquity people always believed in gods regardless of their stature. Taking into consideration the different periods of history, there have been observed cases of incredulity and skepticism as far as the existence of Gods was concerned. The disbelief over gods and generally divergences on the traditional way of treating gods developed

    • 2053 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Epicurus was an ancient Greek philosopher who discovered one of the major philosophies of Ancient Greece, laying the intellectual foundations for modern science and for secular individualism. Epicurus was an ancient Greek philosopher who was born in 341 BC and died in 270 BC. As a boy, he studied philosophy for four years under the Platonist teacher Pamphilus, when he turned 18 he went to Athens for his two-year term of military service. Many of his teachings were strongly influenced by earlier

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In Letter to Menoecceous, Epicurus’ outlines the view that life should be and is about maximizing ones own pleasure. Epicurus importantly notes that pleasure is not necessarily one of a lavish lifestyle, but where pain is absent in body and soul (Epicurus (1), p. 32). This overarching notion filters into his ethical philosophies; in the way that one is and should be just while maintaining the aim of maximizing pleasure. This essay aims to explain the reasons behind Epicurus view that one’s life can

    • 572 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    ideals of a man named Epicurus. Epicureanism is defined by Epicurus as the pleasure for the end of all morality and that real pleasure is attained through a life of prudence, honor, and justice. Epicurus introduced this philosophy around 322 B.C, and two schools established in Athens. Epicurus taught the ethics of his philosophy in his school, that a person should live by "the art of making life happy", and that "prudence is the noblest part of philosophy"(newadvent.org). Epicurus ideals for life intrigued

    • 1438 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Epicureanism is a philosophical theme taught by Epicurus, this theme that stresses the goal of a joyful and a pleasurable life. In the Hellenistic Age, epicureanism was extremely influential. Epicurus, the founder of Epicureanism, is best known for his different personality, unlike all the other ancient philosophers, excluding Socrates (O 'Keefe). Epicurus accumulated a group of disciples and taught them, after that he became known as the “philosophy of the Garden.” The wisdom theory, epicureanism

    • 1306 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Epicurus was one of the major philosophers of the Hellenistic time period. He helped to start the foundation for modern science and also human psychology. His main focus was that one should have happiness and can achieve this by not fearing death or even the gods. Epicurus made many different claims of ideas that were followed by many. His followers were known as Epicureans. They believed that there were three things that motivated people to be unhappy. These three things were hatred, envy, and contempt

    • 286 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In an ancient Greek proverb that goes as follows "Everything in Moderation" the concept of balancing the aspects of one's life is championed. Epicurus offers an almost entirely contradictory life philosophy with serene hedonism as is explored in the article "Happiness in the Garden of Epicurus." Serene Hedonism offers the perspective that the only truly valuable thing in life is that of pleasure while this philosophy initially may sound appealing it lacks any development in a meaningful purpose

    • 416 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Epicurus believed that the idea of pleasure was important but had to restrained. He contributed to modern hedonism. He created the garden a sort of ancient Utopia that he used as a base for his teachings and claimed that all were welcome but must reject their old lives and society. His guide to the good life included the use and creation of Tetrapharmakos, which had four points that people should live by to attain the good life. These included, God is nothing to fear, one if Epicurus’ biggest idea

    • 280 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Class discussions concerning Epicurus seemed the most animated when the class concerned itself with whether or not Epicurus’ philosophy allowed one the ability to defend oneself and one’s beliefs with violence. I believe the second most popular topic concerned sex and relationships. These two topics highlight a larger debate concerning Epicurus’ teachings: are the goals of his teachings a wide social change, or are they primarily concerned with a personal philosophic code? Despite the destruction

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
Previous
Page12345678942