Essay on Tornado

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    Tornado Vs Ef4 Tornado

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    about tornadoes, but to better understand a tornado I needed to know how they are measured. That’s when I learned here in the USA (and Canada) tornadoes are classified by strength and estimated wind speed, according to the Enhanced Fujita Scale (EF-Scale), which assigns a rating of between EF0 and EF5. After carefully reviewing the EF-Scale and getting a better understanding as to the differences between an EFO –EF5 tornadoes, it seems to me any type of tornado can leave deadly damage in its path. Although

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    Tornado Script

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    Tornado Script By: Rachel Lee My name is Rachel Lee. What is severe weather? Is a tornado a type of severe weather? If you want to know, it is yes. A tornado is a type of severe weather. A tornado is a violent, and narrow row of air that moves fast in a circular way, which comes from a thunderstorm to the earth. Tornadoes are recognized or known as cyclones. Cyclones can also be hurricanes, typhoons, or more. They are storms that counts as severe weather and move quickly around in a circular way

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    What is a Tornado?

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    in seconds. They can rip through homes and take lives in less than a minute. Being prepared for a tornado now could save ones life in the future. Tornadoes are strong, spinning columns of air that can form from a thunderstorm. Depending on the strength of the tornado the winds in this column of air can exceed 250 miles per hour. There are multiple conditions that have to be in play for a tornado to form. These violent storms can be faint of very active. Tornadoes are classified as being one of

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    Tornado Prevention

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    and even damage entire neighborhoods. Are you prepared for a tornado? It's important to be prepared for any natural disaster, especially one this dangerous. We can prepare by ourselves, though, the government could help and prepare a bit, too. Then, of course, there is what you need to do after this tragedy. If there is a tornado warning or watch, it is critical that you and your family are prepared. Immediately, after the tornado watch or warning, tie down all loose items. This includes tents

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    Measuring Tornado

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    use Fujita-Pearson to measure the strength or force of a tornado. There are 6 F scale numbers. F6 is the highest category with wind speed 319-379 mph. Next, F5 is incredible tornado with wind speed 261-318 mph. Next, F4 is devastating tornado with wind speed 207-260 mph. It is completely capable of flattening cars and hurling cattle, and F1 can push a mobile home off its foundation. Naming tornadoes The term comes from the Spanish word “tornado”. It is the past participle of the Spanish verb tornar

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    Tornado Essay

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    A tornado is defined as a violently rotating column extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. The most violent tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of two hundred and fifty miles per hour or more. Damage paths can be more than one mile wide and fifty miles long. In an average year, eight hundred tornadoes are reported nationwide, resulting in eighty deaths and over one thousand five hundred injuries. In the body of my essay, I will tell you about types of tornadoes

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    Tornado In America

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    A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that spins while in contact with both the surface of the Earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud. This is what hit a little town called Greensburg Kansas, no bigger than 785 people. The tornado ripped through the town like a child goes through their present on Christmas morning. From this day on Greensburg will never be the same, dreams and hopes scattered everywhere. But, Greensburg came back and hit the tornado

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    Tornado Research

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    Introduction Predicting tornado activity can be one of the most challenging aspects of Meteorology. Tornados can form in less than 10 seconds, providing little to no warning of the potential devastating destruction they leave behind. With advancements in technology being more aware of the formation of tornados would appear to be a natural outcome. Research indicates, that the advancement in predicting tornados is closely related to understanding better why early predictions are challenging.

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    Tornado Alley

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    approximately 1,000 tornadoes that occur each year in the US, but there are also many that go undetected and unreported. In El Reno, Oklahoma, in 2013, a tornado hit and covered 175 miles per hour. This was the fastest, and largest storm ever recorded. Oklahoma has about fifty-two tornadoes occur, on average a year. The definition of a tornado is a small, very intense cyclonic storm with exceedingly high winds, most often produced along cold fronts in conjunction with severe thunderstorms. A cold

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    Tornado Forecasts

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    technology development has lead to forecasts of tornadoes before they have made contact with the ground. Currently the average tornado warning lead time is 13 minutes (Brotzge & Erickson, 2009). Tornado forecasts are still unreliable, most warnings are not broadcasted when the tornado is forming or has formed (Brotzge & Erickson, 2009).

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