Ethanol Fuel Essay

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    Ethanol Fuel

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    alternatives for fuel. Not only are these for environmental purposes, but because of depleting fuel levels caused by over-consumption. One common substitute for fuel-commonly>??? made of crude oil or petroleum is ethanol fuel. This fuel, also know as ethyl alcohol, is created by the fermentation and distillation of corn. There are three main advantages and disadvantages when contemplating the use of this alternative fuel. First, although not popular in North America, it is possible to run cars on fuel containing

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    Ethanol Fuel Essay

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    fossil fuels, but research shows that this fuel source will be depleted completely in approximately 20-25 years. This could cause major setbacks around the world. As a result, we need an alternative source of fuel that could keep the world running on its wheel. One possibility is ethanol. Chemically extract

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    The United States is the world’s largest producer of ethanol fuel, producing over 60% of the world’s ethanol in 2011, which correlates to the creation of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in 2005. The RFS originated with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and was expanded and extended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The RFS requires renewable fuel to be blended into transportation fuel more so every year until it is set to reach 36 billion gallons in 2022 (Renewable). The

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    Corn Ethanol: The Future Fuel? Essay

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    In the world of global warming, all kinds of pollution and fuel shortages going on, renewable and clean/ green energy is increasingly the ideal solution of energy related problems we have to solve one way or another. Biofuel is one of the mainstream and highly supported solutions nowadays, an idea to make renewable fuel by living organisms such as fiber, corn, vegetable oil or sugar cane. Unlike nonrenewable fossil fuels over extracted by people causing various environmental problems like generating

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    The production and consumption of ethanol as fuel is presented by several interesting facts. The ability to compete with non-renewable fossil fuels, concern about the environment and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and have a source of fuel coming from agriculture as a alternative outlet for agricultural producers, ethanol production became an important and endorsed industrial process (Mussatto et al., 2010). Historically, Brazil was a example of country that started with a government program

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    A brief synopsis of the Emerging Ethanol Fuel Industry Ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol, commonly known as Ethanol (commonly seen as E-85 at the gas pumps) has a long history in the United States. Henry Ford considered it the fuel of choice. [1] In fact, his very first automobile, built in 1896, ran solely on ethanol. He said, “There is enough alcohol in one year 's yield of an acre of potatoes to drive the machinery necessary to cultivate the fields for a hundred years.” But it 's use in that capacity

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    Ethanol is now found in most gasolines, except for the few and far between pumps that sell ethanol-free fuel. Ethanol acts as a “filler” in gasoline, because it is much cheaper than many gasoline components, however it comes at a price because ethanol infused gasoline procures about 33% less energy than ethanol free gasoline, dropping its competitiveness towards diesel even more. (Energy, 2015) Ethanol gasoline types include E10, E15, and E85. E10 represents gasoline with a 10% ethanol content, which

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    it focuses on the topic that ethanol is a bad alternative for gasoline for some reasons, and the instructor concentrates on the same issue. However, the instructor claims that the ethanol fuel indeed is a good replacement, which raises doubts about what the reading passage asserts. The instructor, in the lecture, also provides some compelling evidence to back his point of view. To begin with, whereas the reading passage suggests that the increased use of ethanol fuel would not help to solve one of

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    Ethanol Vs Flex Fuel

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    progresses, the use of ethanol in fueling our planet is vastly increasing. The U.S. Department of Energy explained the strong presence of ethanol in saying, “The use of ethanol is widespread, and approximately 97% of gasoline in the U.S. contains some ethanol.” (U.S. Department of Energy, 2016) But the hang up in this is noticing that only 10% of the ethanol is actually utilized, while the other 90% is gasoline. So, the question begs, can we slowly increase this ratio in favor of ethanol? The U.S. Department

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    Ethanol Fuel “According to the Renewable Fuels Association, ethanol production in 2013 added more than 87,000 direct jobs across the country, $44 billion to the gross domestic product, and $30.7 billion in household income” ("Ethanol Benefits and Considerations"). A nonrenewable resource, gasoline, currently occupies the United States’s spot as the main fuel source. This not only means our fuel supply will eventually be depleted, but the country’s main fuel supply is harming the environment. Throughout

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