First Amendment Essay

  • The First Amendment : The Second Amendment

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    The First Amendment The first amendment is one of the most used amendments today. Everyone in the world uses it and sometimes takes advantage of it and most times uses it when needed to. The Bill Of Rights was created on December 15th of 1779 and was created to make some rules in the future because no one had the freedom to do anything. Most were punished if they spoke their opinion, they did not even have the right to choose their own religion. But that all changed when James Madison wrote the Bill

  • The First Amendment

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    101 May 10, 2016 PAPER 4 What I think that the first amendment is that The federal government will do nothing to prevent the expression of thoughts to the ones which are interested in listening to or studying approximately them, nor will it do anything to promote or stifle the exercise of any spiritual religion. Nor will it save you the residents from peacefully protesting or expressing dissent. Which can also suggest by way of the first amendment guarantees freedom of faith, however, there are

  • The First Amendment Essay

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    petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The first and the most significant of the amendments to our Constitution is the First Amendment. "The amendment that established our freedoms as citizens of our new confederation." The First Amendment insures freedom of speech and of the press. The First Amendment ratification was completed on December 15, 1791. This happened when the eleventh State, which is Virginia, approved this amendment. At that time there were fourteen States in the Union

  • Analysis of the First Amendment

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    1. In the First Amendment, the clause that states “Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion” is based on the Establishment Clauses that is incorporated in the amendment. This clauses prohibits the government to establish a state religion and then enforce it on its citizens to believe it. Without this clause, the government can force participation in this chosen religion, and then punish anyone who does not obey to the faith chosen. This clause was in issue in a court case

  • Essay on The First Amendment

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    The First Amendment America was built on freedom. Freedom to speak, freedom to choose, freedom to worship, and freedom to do just about anything you want within the law. America’s law was designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The reason the United States of America came to exist was because the colonists fled Great Britain to get back the freedoms that were taken away from them by the Monarchy. In countries where Monarchies and Dictatorships rule, there is little if any freedom to

  • First Amendment Paper

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    First Amendment Paper The First Amendment is part of the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights is our rights as citizens living in the United States of America. In this paper I will look at three provisions to the First Amendment, highlighting one case for each provision. Included are one case to discuss freedom of speech, one case to discuss separation of church and state and one case to discuss freedom of association. 1.) Discuss at least one Supreme Court case of significance related to three

  • The First Amendment Essay

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    want within that of the law. America’s law has been designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The First Amendment guarantees freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. It assures citizens that the federal government shall not restrict freedom of worship. It specifically prohibits Congress from establishing an official, government supported church. Under The First Amendment, the federal government cannot require citizens to pay taxes to support a certain church, nor can people

  • Religion And The First Amendment

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    Religion and the First Amendment in Schools Recently, students were instructed to write an essay along with a pictorial representation of the person they considered to be their hero. Since one student chose Jesus as his hero and submitted a drawing of the Last Supper, possible legal complications need to be considered before grading and displaying the assignment. An examination of First Amendment legal issues that arise when a student submits an assignment of religious nature will provide insight

  • First Amendment Paper

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    The First Amendment Freedom is being breached all over the U.S and most of it is being taken away from the press. Sure the Patriot Act is killing everyone's privacy in secrecy all over the US, but journalists and reporters are being put in jail right and left. The government has infringed on their rights in a way that should not be with the first amendment. It seems like the more people let the government do, the more steps the government takes to take first amendment rights from people. For

  • Importance Of The First Amendment

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    The Importance of the First Amendment When our Nation had regarded themselves as thirteen newly colonies and to separate themselves from Great Britain. Congress had imparted to the state legislature twelve amendments to the Constitution. These Amendments later became the Bill of Rights, the first basic rights that the country was founded to provide. The whole point that the Bill of Rights were made was so that new Federal Government were prevented from impairing human rights and freedom. However

  • The Argument Of The First Amendment

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    The purpose of the First Amendment is to “ensure against government intrusions on personal freedoms such as freedom of religion, freedom of the press, free expression, freedom of association, and freedom of assembly (Michigan State University)”. So with the first amendment preventing against government intrusions on religion could a football coach at a public high school lead the players in prayer before a game? Well the answer is no, it is against the law for schools to sponsor or endorse speech

  • Cyberbullying And The First Amendment

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    Examination of Cyberbullying and the First Amendment This paper addresses a situation in which a student notified this author that she was being subjected to bullying through another classmate’s Facebook page. A discussion of steps required by Oregon’s statutes, the Lake Oswego School District 's board policies and the student handbook, will provide a basis for examining any First Amendment arguments that the bullying has raised, with a discussion of the author 's First Amendment responses consistent with

  • The Violation Of The First Amendment Essay

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    ISSUE: Does having members who opt out of a union continue to pay agency fees violate the First Amendment to the Constitution? Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association 136 S. Ct. 1083, 194 L. Ed. 2d 255 The issue at hand is whether or not it is a violation of the First Amendment to the Constitution to require non-union members to pay agency fees. Agency fees are used to pay for representing employees and negotiating contracts, in addition to lobbying activities to support collective bargaining

  • The First Amendment Essay

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    press; or the right of the people to assemble peacefully, and to petition the Government for e redress of grievances.      The first and inargueably the most significant of the amendments to our Constitution is the First Amendment. The amendment that established our freedoms as citizens of our new confederation. The First Amendment insured, among other things, freedom of speech and of the press. Since the establishment of these rights, they have often been in question. People

  • The First Amendment Essay

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    The First Amendment The 1st Amendment forbids Congress from enacting laws that would regulate speech or press before publication or punish after publication. At various times many states passed laws in contradiction to the freedoms guaranteed in the 1st Amendment. However broadcast has always been considered a special exemption to free speech laws for two reasons. 1) the most important reasons is the scarcity of spectrum and the 2) is the persuasiveness of the medium. Because radio and TV come

  • Essay on The First Amendment

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    The First Amendment is the first section of the Bill of Rights and is often considered the most important part of the U.S Constitution because it guarantees the citizens of United States the essential personal freedoms of religion, speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the Government. Thanks to the rights granted by the First Amendment, Americans are able to live in a country where they can freely express themselves, speak their mind, pray without interference, protest in

  • The Importance Of The First Amendment

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    The first amendment is the most important part of the Constitution because it has been the most exercised right by U.S citizens. First amendment states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Meaning, as citizens, the Constitution protects our freedom of religion

  • Speech On The First Amendment

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    Part 2: Final Exam The First Amendment protects any person’s freedom of speech from Congress, state government and local public officials. However, this does not allow individuals to be free in saying anything that they want to say. One example of speech that is not protected by the First Amendment are crimes involving speech. If a form of speech is used to commit a crime such as perjury, harassment or extortion, it will not be provided protection by the First Amendment. Another example is Conduct

  • Essay on The First Amendment

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    The First Amendment The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is part of our countries Bill of Rights. The first amendment is perhaps the most important part of the U.S. Constitution because the amendment guarantees citizens freedom of religion, speech, writing and publishing, peaceful assembly, and the freedom to raise grievances with the Government. In addition, amendment requires that there be a separation maintained between church and state. Our first amendment to the United States Constitution

  • Tattoos And The First Amendment Essay

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    Your Tattoos Can Say Whatever They Want, Right? Tattoos and the First Amendment In the United States of America, the First Amendment of the Constitution assures individuals such civil liberties as the freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. Freedom of speech preserves not only an individual’s right to vocally express themselves unabridged, it also allows them the right to burn the American flag, engage in silent protest, and more recently (2016), get a tattoo. In some respects

  • Essay on Reflection on the First Amendment

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    guarantees for civil liberties. To provide such guarantees, the First Amendment along with the other nine Amendments known as the Bill of Rights were submitted to the states for ratification on September 25, 1789 and adopted on December 15, 1791. This was a guarantee of the essential rights and liberties that were omitted in the original documents. A series of cases will be presented in this paper to provide a clear idea of the First Amendment. Cases that have cause an impact in society and have changed

  • Limits to the First Amendment Essays

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    Limits to the First Amendment The United States of America seems to be protected by a very important historical document called the Constitution. Despite the fact that it was written and signed many years ago, the American people and their leaders still have faith in the Constitution. One of the major statements of the Constitution is the First Amendment, freedom of speech. Although it is difficult to decide what is offensive and what is not, it is clear to see that songs of rape, violence,

  • Reflections on the First Amendment Paper

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    Reflections on the First Amendment Paper Ephraim Iivula HIS/301 May 29, 2011 Kenneth Johnston University of Phoenix Reflections on the First Amendment According to the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and

  • The First Amendment Of The United States

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    First Amendment: Where It Originated and How to Protect It On September 17, 1787, the United States Constitution was signed by delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, who were directed by George Washington. The 1787 convention was called to draft a new legal system for the United States now that the states were free and colonized. This new Constitution was made to increase federal authority while still protecting the rights of citizens. It established America’s National Government

  • The First Amendment Of The United States Essay

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    The first amendment to the U.S. Constitution states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…” The Supreme Court has been inconsistent in the application of these sometimes conflicting requirements. At times, the Court takes a separationist position, erecting a solid wall between church and state, and at other times takes an accommodationist position, siding with an individual’s right to exercise their religious beliefs. Religious

  • How Important Is The First Amendment?

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    How Important is the First Amendment? The First Amendment was adopted in 1791. It states that “Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” (Wikipedia, 2016) The freedom of speech documented in the First Amendment is not only a constitutional protection, but also an inevitable part of democratic government and independence, which are essential values in our

  • Essay about First Amendment

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    First Amendment The modern American conception of freedom of speech comes from the principles of freedom of the press, and freedom of religion as they developed in England, starting in the seventeenth century. The arguments of people like John Milton on the importance of an unlicensed press, and of people like John Locke on religious toleration, were all the beginning for the idea of the “freedom of speech”. By the year of 1791, when the First Amendment was ratified, the idea of “freedom

  • The Is A First Amendment Right For Newspapers?

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    In our world at this particular time people are overly sensitive to what is published in the media, mainly about anything to do with religion. I believe that it is a first amendment right for newspapers to publish cartoons even if it is viewed as offensive to a certain population. What is not acceptable is the way it is handled by society. Things have been taken way out of proportion. It is unjust and goes against the Constitution of the United States if anyone has to suppress their opinions just

  • The Importance of the First Amendment Essays

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    Importance of the First Amendment "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of Religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech," this Amendment is the most important part of the constitution. Without free speech, we the people of the United States would not be able to speak openly and freely about issues that affect our everyday life. Had it not been for Katie Stanton and Susan B. Anthony exercising their first amendment right to free speech

  • The First Amendment : Uncensored Speech

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    The First Amendment: Uncensored Speech Centuries ago in American society, individuals were not granted the free will to act and speak freely. First Amendment rights allowed citizens to do so. On a historical outlook, the oppressed fought for the rights of various groups in the United States. Although laws and situations evolve, groups in America continue to face inequality and issues with freedom of speech. There is room for further improvement; freedom for all citizens needs to be fulfilled. The

  • Flag Burning and the First Amendment

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       Your First Amendment rights are extremely close to being violated by none other than the United States Congress. I refer to the Flag Desecration Bill that, if passed, would do irreparable damage to our right to free speech and undermine the very priniciples for which the American flag stands. Fortunately, West Virginians have an ally in Sen. Robert C. Byrd. Sen. Byrd, who previously favored the bill, now fights to protect our rights by stopping the passage of this bill. I applaud his stand

  • Essay on Reflections On The First Amendment

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    Reflections on the First Amendment On December 15th, 1971, the first X amendments to the Constitution went into affect. The first X amendments to the constitution were known as the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment was written by James Madison because the American people were demanding a guarantee of their freedom. The First Amendment was put into place to protect American’s freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly and freedom of petition. The First Amendment was written as follows;

  • The First Amendment Of Our Constitution

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    know. An important thing to know about freedom of speech is it does not actually protect anything we want to say. However freedom of speech is something that the United States holds high. The first amendment of our constitution is one of the most important amendments we have to protect us. The first amendment gives us the right to free speech with very few limits. Even though this may not be the best policy it is important we protect any speech so long as it is not harming anyone. The constitution

  • The First Amendment Of The United States

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    Exercise Thereof; or Abridging the Freedom of Speech, or of the Press; or the Right of the People Peaceably to Assemble, and To Petition the Government for a Redress of Grievances” (U.S. Const. amend. I). Without the basic freedoms that the First Amendment of the United States Constitution allots to United States citizens, the societal progression that has been made in more than 200 years would be lost. The courageous words of Martin Luther King Jr. would only be a whisper among an insignificant-sized

  • The First Amendment Of The United States Constitution

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    These 45 words of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution embody some of our most important ideas about the meaning of liberty. A nationally recognized leader in the field of law related citizen education has truly broken down the importance of the First Amendment and he say, “Remove the First Amendment from the United States Constitution and you strike out the very means of testing the other rights and of protesting abuses of government.” The First Amendment includes six clauses that

  • Is Flag Burning Protected By The First Amendment?

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    by the First Amendment? Adriana Ramirez First Amendment Dr. Helen Boutrous December 8, 2016 Mount Saint Mary’s University The First Amendment says: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press; or the right of the people to peaceably assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances. This freedom of speech clause as included in the First Amendment guarantees

  • Essay on The First Amendment and its Impact on Media

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    The First Amendment and its Impact on Media Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The first amendment to the United State's constitution is one of the most important writings in our short history. The first amendment has defined and shaped our country into what

  • First Amendment and Free Speech Essay

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    This paper will examine the first amendment’s right to free speech based on three different Supreme Court cases and how there are varying examples of free speech. In the case of Snyder v. Phelps, Snyder sued Phelps, the Westboro Baptist Church, for intentional infliction of emotional distress, invasion of privacy by intrusion upon seclusion, and conspiracy because the church set-up protest outside of his military son’s funeral service (Chen et al., 2010). Another side of free speech involves a

  • The Actions And Speech Are Protected By The First Amendment Essay

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    One of the many battle grounds of debate in the U.S. currently is what actions and speech are protected by the first amendment. Since there is so much that is not directly defined in the Constitution, there is room for interpretation on whether or not certain it is protected by it. One topic in particular is supporting the terrorist group ISIS. ISIS is a group of Muslim extremist based out of Syria. Their goals are to create a radical extremist state, the caliphate, through religious violence (Abu

  • The First Amendment in High School Essay

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    What is the age that a person should be able to claim rights under the first amendment? The first thing would come to most people's mind is eighteen. However, upon examination, someone could easily justify that a sixteen year old who is in his or her second year of college would have the ability to form an opinion and should be allowed to express it. What makes this student different from another student who, at sixteen, drops out of school and gets a job, or a student who decides to wear a shirt

  • In “Assessing The First Amendment As A Defense For Wikileaks

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    In “Assessing the First Amendment as a Defense for WikiLeaks and Other Publishers of Previously Undisclosed Government Information,” Janelle Allen explores whether WikiLeaks should be entitled to the same protections that traditional media outlets are given when they publish classified information. In her work, she goes over two possible avenues that the government can take if it wants to silence WikiLeaks; the two options are: prior restraint (censorship) and the Espionage Act. Allen, in order to

  • First Amendment And Music Censorship Essay

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    The First Amendment to the Bill of Rights exists because the Founders of our country understood the importance of free expression. The First Amendment states "Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press . . ." (Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution 17). One of the ways the American people use this freedom of speech and expression is through the creation of the art form known as music. Music's verbal expression bonds our society

  • Youth and the First Amendment Essay example

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    Youth and the First Amendment Many freedom of speech and expression issues that receive media attention have to do with the adult population and what they feel their rights are. What many fail to recognize is the fact that the youth today are also dealing with freedom of speech and expression issues in their own lives. The freedom of speech and expression issues that young people deal with are just as important and are handled in the same manner as any other freedom of speech issue. Three articles

  • Freedom Of Speech By The First Amendment Of The Constitution

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    Words are significant; they enable us to be expressive and create individuality amongst ourselves. According to Literacy, “The right to speak without censorship or restraint by the government… is protected by the First Amendment of the Constitution.” (Literacy, 2005) This definition describes the most important freedom in my eyes. Without freedom of speech, I am unable to be the individual that I strive to be, which is to stick out and be unique, which is why I treasure freedom of speech the most

  • Modern Interpretation of The First Amendment Essay

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    Modern Interpretation of The First Amendment The first Amendment of the United States Constitution says; “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”[1] Our fore fathers felt that this statement was plain enough for all to understand, however quite often the United

  • First Amendment- Religion Cases Of Religion

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    First Amendment- Religion Cases Religion is defined by a commitment or devotion to religious faith or observance. This probably was not the exact definition that the Founding Fathers knew but it was close. In the United States Constitution the very first amendment describes a few of the people’s unalienable rights. The First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the

  • The First Amendment Of The United States Constitution

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    this chant, along with many others that the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association wrote, “are clearly intended to taunt or disrespect.” Correct me if I am wrong, but isn’t it my right to taunt the referees, players and coaches? The First Amendment of the United States Constitution protects the right to freedom of expression from government interference. Freedom of expression consists of the rights to freedom of speech, press, assembly, the right to make a complaint or seek assistance from

  • Student 's First Amendment Rights

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    Student’s First Amendment Rights: Kindergarten Student Playing a Game If a student says, “I am going to shoot you” during recess to his friends, does the school have a right to take disciplinary actions? Is it a violation of the student’s First Amendment? School officials can restrict speech activities on any student in a school if it has been established there was harm or threats made against others, including teachers. Although the First Amendment states freedom of expression, school

  • The First Amendment : The Second Amendment

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    The Second Amendment Ever since the beginning of American Revolution in April 1775, Americans have sought to create a nation with no ties to the British monarch and create and more, perfect union. They decided to create a democratic, republic government consisting of voted officials voted by the people, governed by a system of checks and balances with limited powers and the purpose of providing protection and services to its citizens. However, The Founding Fathers believed that should the government

  • The First Amendment Of The United States Constitution

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    are many elements of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution to address. The area of the Freedom of Speech applies to every aspect of our daily lives. An examination of this area shows us why there are protected and unprotected areas of speech: speeches and actions that have been debated throughout our nation’s history and why they are important and have such an impact on our individual lives and social activities today. The adoption of the First Amendment drafted by James Madison,