Frantz Fanon Essay

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    Critical Commentary of Frantz Fanon

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    “The issue of reading Fanon today, then, is perhaps not about finding the moment of relevance in Fanon’s text that corresponds with the world, but in searching for the moments where Fanon’s text and the world do not correspond, and asking how Fanon, the revolutionary, would think and act in the period of retrogression.” A complete study of 1968 and its legacies in Europe can not solely deal with events that occurred on the continent. 1968 was, in fact, a “global phenomenon”; with ideas perpetrated

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    better illustrate why Fanon’s work stroke a chord with many activists, we first need to consider Fanon’s contribution to the study of the psychological effects of anti-black racism and his concept of decolonization. Born and raised in Martinique, Frantz Fanon grew up in a well-to-do middle-class environment. His mother in particular took great care that her son was well-versed in the language and the culture of the French colonizers,

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    Written by Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth is an analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. In the book, Fanon analyzes the psychological effect of colonization has on the psyche of a nation as well as its broader suggestions for building a movement for decolonization. Fanon argues that violence in a controlled decolonization situation is okay and it serves in the creation of a national identity in a post-colonial state. He is saying that it is perfectly acceptable

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    nonviolent, a modern voice, and strategic. “The native intellectual has clothed his aggressiveness in his barely veiled desire to assimilate himself to the colonial world. He used his aggressiveness to serve his own individual interests,” (60). Here, Fanon emphasizes the native intellectual’s aggressiveness for power. He has hid his initial plan to eliminate the settler and take his position of authority, by assimilating to his beliefs. These revolve around the idea of a colonial world. This world is

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    Frantz Fanon

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    Frantz Fanon was a deeply involved and diligent philosopher who recognized the separation and relations between the oppressed and the oppressors as well as the fight for freedom. He specifically speaks on Algeria as the colonized, facing the French who were the colonizers. Fanon was writing mainly during the 1940’ s-60 when decolonization was becoming popular. Fanon was greatly involved in the decolonization struggle, and in his book The Wretched of the Earth, Fanon explains and observes the ways

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    Frantz Fanon once said in The Wretched of the Earth, “The colonized underdeveloped man is a political creature in the most global sense of the term.” Frantz Fanon was born in 1925 in Martinique, a French colony in the Caribbean Sea. He was descended from African slaves who had previously been brought to the island. Fanon left Martinique at the age of 18 and fought for France in the last years of World War II. It was during the war that he experienced extensive racism from his white European peers

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    1) According to Frantz Fanon decolonization is a violent event. Explain what this claim means along with why Fanon supports it. According to Fanon, decolonization is “the substitution of one ‘species’ of mankind by another”. (Fanon, 1) By “species,” Fanon refers to the colonist and another are the colonized. It is a violent event because it is the processes when colonized become independent from the colonizers. The consciousness of the colonized demands freedom and change of order. At the same

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    Aime Cesaire's Life

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    Aimé Césaire was born in Basse-Pointe, Martinique, in the French Caribbean. His father, Fernand Elphège, was educated as teacher, but later worked as a manager of a sugar estate. Eléonore, his mother a seamstress. In Cahier Césaire described his childhood without mercy: "And the bed of planks from which my race has risen, all my race from this bed of planks on its feet of kerosene cases, as if the old bed had elephantiasis, covered with a goat skin, and its dried banana leaves and its rags, the ghost

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    Because of the nature of the program, Frantz Fanon argues that decolonization cannot be achieved without violence. Hence, the author claims that “decolonization is always a violent phenomenon” (35). Decolonization is itself a violent program dues to the fact that colonies are created with violence. Because of “the violence which has ruled over the ordering of the colonial world, that same violence will be claimed and taken over by the native at the moment when he surges into the forbidden quarters”

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    Violence of Decolonization Essay

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    Violence of Decolonization Frantz Fanon argues the decolonization must always be a violent phenomenon because resisting a colonizing power using only politics will not work. Europeans justified colonization by treating it as gods work. They believed that god wanted then to occupy all lands and spread the word of god to savages of darker skin color. Fanon joined the Algerian Nationalist Movement when the Algeria was being colonized be the French. Many examples of violence written of in The

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